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1428-03 ASP - Lake Newell Resort- County of Newell No. 4 By-law No.1428-03 A By-law of the County of Newell No. 4, in the Province of Alberta, to adopt an Area Structure Plan for±225 ha (±556 ac) within portions of section 6-18-14-W4, portions of the west'h of 7-18-14-W4, portions of the northeast 12-18-15-W4 and portions of the east'/2 of 1-18-15-W4. This is to be known as the Lake Newell Reservoir Resort Area Structure Plan. Whereas Council proposes to establish a framework for the orderly subdivision and development of ±225 ha (±556 ac) within portions of section 6-18-14-W4, portions of the west'/Z of 7-18-14-W4, portions of the northeast 12-18-15-W4 and portions of the east'/2 of 1-18-15-W4 located south of the Town of Brooks. And Whereas this Plan will identify existing development and will outline the procedures and conditions under which future subdivision and development will be allowed to proceed. And Whereas the Area Structure Plan will establish the County of Newell's planning policies for this area which will be used by the land owners as well as other Government and Municipal agencies and utility companies in the formulation r of their plans and priorities for development. Therefore be it resolved that this By-law receive first reading and that the necessary Public Hearing be held to hear comments on this Plan. Further be it resolved that this By-law receive second and third reading after the Public Hearing and that this By-law take effect on final passing of the By-law. April 10, 2003 Moved by Councillor Musgrove that By-law 1428-03 receive first reading. Carried. July 10, 2003 Moved by Councillor Loewen that By-law 1428-03 receive second reading. Carried. August 18, 2003 Moved by Councillor Loewen that By-law 1428-03 receive third and final reading. Carried. REEVE COUNTY ADMINISTRATOR Lake Newell Reservoir Resort Area Structure Plan The County of Newell No. 4 Bylaw Number: 1428-03 Prepared By: Planning Protocol Inc. 3916 - 1St Street N.E. Calgary, AB. T2E 3E3 Tel: (403) 230-5522, Fax: (403) 230-5924 August, 2003 Lake Newell Reservoir Resort Area Structure Plan ,~- 1.0 Introduction 1 1.1 Purpose of the Area Structure Plan 1 1.2 Background to the Plan Area 1 1.3 The Approval Process 2 1.4 Plan Implementation 3 1.5 Plan Review and Amendment 3 1.6 Interpretation 3 1.7 Legislative and Bylaw Framework 4 1.7.1 Municipal Government Act 4 1.7.2 County of Newell No. 4 Municipal Development Plan 4 1.7.3 County of Newell No. 4 Land Use Bylaw 5 1.7.4 Lake Newell Condominium Association Bylaws 5 2.0 The Site 6 2.1 Location and Size 6 2.2 Land Ownership 6 2.3 Site Description 6 2.4 Natural Constraints to Development 6 2.5 Existing Land Uses 7 2.6 Adjacent Land Uses 8 3.0 Natural Features 9 3.1 Topography and Drainage 9 3.2 Soils and Geology 9 3.3 Lake Newell Irrigation Reservoir 9 3.3.1 Water Quality 9 3.3.2 Reservoir Levels 10 3.4 Ecology 10 3.5 Historical Resources Overview and Impact Assessment 11 3.6 Environmental Site Assessment 11 3.7 GeotechnicalInvestigation 11 3.8 Significant Vegetation Species 11 3.9 Wildlife Species 12 4.0 Policies Effecting the Plan 13 4.1 County of Newell No. 4 Municipal Development Plan 13 4.2 Country of Newell No. 4 Land Use Bylaw 14 4.3 Greenwald Inlet East Area Structure Plan 14 5.0 Other Relevant Documents 15 5.1 Lake Newell Reservoirs: Recreational Analysis and Concept Plan 15 5.2 Tourism, Environment and Sustainability: AConcept for Greenwald Inlet 15 5.3 County of Newell No. 4, Environmentally Significant Areas 16 Lake Newell Reservoir Resort Area Structure Plan ,•- 6.0 The Plan 1~ 6.1 The Plan Area 1 ~ 6.2 Goals and Objectives 17 6.3 The Plan Vision 1 ~ 7.0 Proposed Land Use 19 7.1 Land Use Overview 19 7.1.1 East Development 20 7.1.2 West Development 20 7.1.3 Inlet (North) Development 21 7.2 Residential Development 21 7.2.1 Resort Residential 1 (RRI) 21 7.2.2 Resort Residential 2 (RR2) 22 7.3 Resort Commercial (RC) 22 7.4 Public/Semi-Public Open Space (PS) 23 8.0 Reserve Lands 24 8.1 Municipal Reserve 24 8.2 Environmental Reserve 24 9.0 Transportation 25 9.1 External Roads 25 9.2 Internal Roads 25 9.3 Parking 26 9.4 Watercraft 27 10.0 Environmental Issues 28 10.1 Oil and Gas Wells and Pipelines 2$ 10.2 Water Pollution and Shoreline Erosion 28 11.0 Servicing and Utilities 29 11. l Water Supply and Distribution 29 11.2 Wastewater Collection and Treatment 30 11.3 Stormwater Management 32 11.4 Electrical Service 33 11.5 Natural Gas 33 11.6 Telephone and Cable 33 12.0 Community Services 34 12.1 Police Service 34 12.2 Fire Protection 34 12.3 Emergency Medical Services 34 12.4 Solid Waste Services 34 13.0 Development Sequence 36 13.1 Phasing Plan 36 Lake Newell Reservoir Resort Area Structure Plan 1.0 Introduction 1.1 Purpose of the Area Structure Plan The Lake Newell Reservoir Resort Area Structure Plan (ASP) has been prepared in accordance with Section 633(1) of the Municipal Government Act and the policies of the County of Newell No. 4 Municipal Development Plan. Under Policy 3.1.4 of the County of Newell Municipal Development Plan, the County may require the adoption of an ASP in any area experiencing residential development pressures and where development would result in more than ten adjacent lots. The Eastern Irrigation District, the owner and manager of the Lake Newell Reservoir, also requires the adoption of an ASP on lands along the shores of the Reservoir to ensure such future development protects Lake Newell as an irrigation reservoir and provides public access to the lakeshore. 'This ASP plans the subdivision and development of approximately 556 acres of land located on the northeast shore of Lake Newell Reservoir, an area known as Greenwald Inlet. The purpose of the Lake Newell Reservoir Resort ASP is to serve as a guide for appropriate residential and recreational development in the Plan area. The Plan also establishes development standards and phasing for the Plan area. In no manner does this ASP redesignate any lands in the Plan Area. A request to amend the Land Use Bylaw maybe made at a later date. 'The Plan covers the following major topics: a) The purpose and background to the preparation of the ASP b) Natural features of the site c) Development constraints of the site d) Existing land use policies and planning documents impacting development e) The Goals and Vision of the Plan f) The proposed land use concept plan g) Municipal and environmental reserve lands h) The proposed transportation network i) Environmental issues associated with development of the Plan area j) Servicing of the Plan area, including water supply, storm water, sanitary sewage, solid waste disposal, other utilities, and community services k) The sequence of development for the Plan area 1.2 Background to the Plan Area This Area Structure Plan is prepared pursuant to the November 28, 2001 decision by the County of Newell No. 4 Municipal Planning Commission requiring an Area Structure Plan for the Lake Newell Reservoir Resort Development before approving any further subdivision. This Plan is the result of the growth of shoreline development around the Reservoir and various development pressures over the last 20 years. It is also a result of the need to manage, protect, and plan the remaining undeveloped lands for recreation and tourism. Lake Newell Reservoir Resort Area Structure Plan ,~ Planning work on this project commenced in the late 1980s and was processed by the County in the early 1990s. H. Jager Developments was the original developer who purchased the land from the Eastern Irrigation District and began constructing the existing improvements. The original planning consultant was Clark & Associate Surveys. An Outline Plan was submitted for the entire site that was approved in 1993 along with the redesignation. Extensive surveying was undertaken in 1993 to determine both the existing high water mark and the 1:100 year high water elevations. In 1993 a legal survey was registered which defined the high water mark and the developmental setback area protecting the shoreline from any future encroachment from potential development. This environmentally sensitive area including the water body was registered as Plan 9311658. In 1994, a subdivision application registering six larger blocks of land on the southwest side of Greenwald Inlet was approved. Two of these blocks were further subdivided into condominium plans in 1994 (condominium plan 9411167), creating approximately 160 bareland condo lots. Not all of these condominium units have been built out. Several utility easements right-of--ways were created to accommodate the utility services. Four municipal reserve parcels were created in addition to two public utility lots (one for the water treatment facility and another for the sewage collection and pump out station). In 1998/1999, work began on the Greenwald Inlet East Area Structure Plan. The Greenwald Inlet East ASP, which covered the east side of the Plan area, was approved on September 23, 1999. In 1999, the original development company, H. Jager Developments was sold to Westbridge Development Inc. and the project had a new developer. In late 1999, under the new developer, a subdivision application to create a 100-lot subdivision on the east side of Greenwald Inlet was processed and approved (but not registered). The new developer, however, wanted to expand the Lake Newell Reservoir development to the west and north sides of the inlet, and this new concept triggered the need for a new Area Structure Plan covering the entire Plan area. Ownership of the land has changed again, and it is now comprised of an ownership group of K300 Financial Corp., Westbridge Developments Inc., and Zadi Investments Ltd., which make up the current Area Structure Plan Applicant. 1.3 The Approval Process Under Section 3.1.4 of the County of Newell No. 4 Municipal Development Plan, the County may require the preparation and adoption of an Area Structure Plan in any area that is experiencing residential development pressures and where development would result in more than 10 adjacent lots. The landowners of the Plan area retained Planning Protocol Inc. to complete the Area Structure ~- Plan. All the supporting documentation that accompanies this ASP, listed under the 2 Lake Newell Reservoir Resort Area Structure Plan ~- Supplementary Reports heading in the Table of Contents, has been submitted to the County for review and consideration. Following reviews by County of Newell staff, the Plan was presented to Council as a proposed Bylaw adopting the Plan as the Lake Newell Reservoir Resort Area Structure Plan. 1.4 Plan Implementation The Lake Newell Reservoir Resort Area Structure Plan, adopted by Bylaw in accordance with Section 633(1) of the Municipal Government, will become a statutory document of the County of Newell No. 4. In accordance with Section 692(1) of the Municipal Government Act, Council held a Public Hearing with respect to the proposed Bylaw. The Lake Newell Reservoir Resort ASP supersedes the Greenwald Inlet East ASP. 1.5 Plan Review and Amendment While the Lake Newell Reservoir Resort ASP is designed to establish long-term planning strategies for the Plan area, changing considerations (e.g. environmental, social, and economic) may require amendments to the Plan from time to time. The County will periodically review this Plan and amend it or any other entity may amend it upon approval from Council, if necessary, and will hold a Public Hearing as required by the Municipal Government Act prior to giving second reading to any proposed amendment. A review of this Plan will be undertaken every five years or as deemed necessary by Council. 1.6 Interpretation The following definitions apply to terms used in this Plan: a) "Council" means the Council of the County of Newell No. 4. b) "Plan" means the Lake Newell Reservoir Resort Area Structure Plan. c) "Plan of Subdivision" means a detailed proposal for development of the land and forms the basis for an application for subdivision. d} "Plan area" means all the lands contained within the boundaries of this Plan. e) "ASP" stands for Area Structure Plan as defined in the Municipal Government Act of the Province of Alberta. f) "MGA" stands for Municipal Government Act of the Province of Alberta (1994) g) "Municipal Reserve" (MR) as defined by section 666(1) of the Municipal Government Act of the Province of Alberta h) "Environmental Reserve" (ER) as defined by section 664(1) of the Municipal Government Act of the Province of Alberta. ,.... i) "Developer Unit Levy" is the negotiated amount charged to the developer by the County regarding charges for infrastructure, such as sewer, water, roads Lake Newell Reservoir Resort Area Structure Plan ,r- j) "Unit Levy" is a monthly levy charged to each resident by the Resident's Association for provision of services, such as sewer, water, roads, garbage, maintenance of open spaces, and other similar items k) "EID" stands for the Eastern Irrigation District 1) The "Woodbay study" refers to the Lake Newell Reservoirs: Recreational Analysis and Concept Plan study completed in 1990 by Woodbay Consulting Limited m) "EdOx-13 and 16" refer to two archaeological sites just west of the Plan area identified in a Historical Resources Impact Assessment completed by Aresco Ltd. in 1993 n) "Twp. Road 182" refers to the Twp. 18r2 Range 14 that forms the Plan area's northern boundary 1.7 Legislative and Bylaw Framework 1.7.1 The Municipal Government Act Under the Municipal Government Act, a municipal council may adopt an Area Structure Plan for the purpose of providing a framework for subsequent subdivision and development of an area of land within the Municipality. The Municipal Government Act outlines the requirements for an Area Structure Plan in Section 633(2) as follows: "An area structure plan (a) must describe .-^ (i) the sequence of development proposed for the area, (ii) the land uses proposed for the area, either generally or with respect to specific parts of the area, and (iii) the density of population proposed for the area either generally or with respect of specific parts of the area, and, (iv) the general location of major transportation routes and public utilities, and (b) may contain any other matters the council considers necessary." 1.7.2 County of Newell No. 4 Municipal Development Plan Council adopted the County of Newell Municipal Development Plan in July 1997. It is a long- term statutory planning document that guides future growth and development and impacts the use of land within the County of Newell through a framework of goals and policies. Specific policies designed to achieve the objectives of the Municipal Development Plan and other relevant statutory plans are outlined in Section 4.1 of this Plan. It should be noted that the Municipal Development Plan is currently under review. Amendments made to the Municipal Development Plan may affect future amendments to this Area Structure Plan, and/or future subdivision and development applications. 4 Lake Newell Reservoir Resort Area Structure Plan .-- 1.7.3 County of Newell No. 4 Land Use Bylaw The County of Newell No. 4 Land Use Bylaw adopted by Council in May 1990 regulates and controls the use of land and buildings within the County of Newell. The Land Use Bylaw divides all the land in the County into a specific Land Use District type. Each Land Use District lists specific land use controls within this district, including permitted uses, discretionary uses, minimum lot areas and setbacks, site restrictions, and special regulations. Specific regulations in the Land Use Bylaw that apply to the proposed development are outlined in Section 4.2 of this Plan. It should be noted that the Land Use Bylaw is currently under review. Amendments made to the Land Use Bylaw may affect future amendments to this Area Structure Plan, and/or future subdivision and development applications. 1.7.4 Lake Newell Condominium Association Bylaws A search of the land titles that comprise the Plan area shows no caveats registered to the Lake Newell Condominium Association. Therefore, the bylaws of the Lake Newell Condominium Association do not apply to any lands outside of the 160 existing registered lots. However, a newly created Resident's Association will manage all new development in the Plan area, and a link is proposed between the existing Condominium Association and the proposed Resident's Association in order to coordinate tasks and avoid duplication of services. At the request of the County of Newell a new condominium corporation is not to be created for the entire Plan area as condominium corporations do not qualify for infrastructure (sewer line) grants from the Government of Alberta. 5 Lake Newell Reservoir Resort Area Structure Plan -- 2.0 The Site 2.1 Location and Size The Plan area is located in the County of Newell, in the southeastern part of Alberta approximately 10 km south of the Town of Brooks. The subject lands are situated along the shores of Greenwald Inlet on the Lake Newell Reservoir. The Plan area is approximately 556 acres in size. At the request of the Eastern Irrigation District this ASP does not include the lands in the N.E. '/4 1-18-15-4 currently owned by Eastern Irrigation District. If in the future the Eastern Irrigation District chooses to develop their property, they will be required to create their own Area Structure Plan or amend this Plan. The Plan area encompasses a portion of the following quarter sections of land as shown in Figure 1: • Pt. N.W. '/4 Section 7-18-14 W4M • Pt. N.E. '/4 Section 12-18-15 W4M • Pt. S.W. '/4 Section 7-18-14 W4M • Pt. N.E. '/4 Section 1-18-15 W4M • Pt. N.W. '/a Section 6-18-14 W4M • Pt. N.E. '/4 Section 6-18-14 W4M • Pt. S.E. '/4 Section 1-18-15 W4M ,--. • Pt. S.W.'/4 Section 6-18-14 W4M • Pt. S.E. '/4 Section 6-18-14 W4M 2.2 Land Ownership A consortium of three companies, K300 Financial Corp., Westbridge Developments Inc., and Zadi Investments Ltd., comprise the ownership group of the lands within the Plan area (Figure 2). At the time of this Plan, K300 Financial Corp. is the name that appears on the title of these lands. 2.3 Site Description The Plan area is a mixture of marshlands near the Lakeshore, and gently rolling mixed-grass prairie rangelands away from the Lakeshore. There is very little tree cover in this semi-arid, sublime, prairie landscape. There has been minimal use of the land for agricultural purposes. Figure 3 shows an aerial view of the site. 2.4 Natural Constraints to Development The Eastern Irrigation District has a 30+ metre development setback from the bake Newell Reservoir full supply level shoreline in place around the Lake Newell Reservoir. This is to ,-, protect the shoreline from erosion and other disturbance, maintain public access to the shoreline, and protect buildings from flooding due to the fluctuating water levels in the Lake Newell 6 Z ~$~ W Q ~~ F W F ~ E 5 a~ z ~ ^, ~ ~ ~ ~ ~~ ~ J ~ ~ a~ z F" Z ~ ~ 3 o ~ d o ~ Y ,~ ~ ~ U ~~~~~ ~ w o ~~d~ m _~ ,~ ~~ EL8 hVMH~JIH EL8 .lf/MHJIH N ~ ~ --- ~ --- C~ 1 --- ~ , -- p -- - - p - O Q O ~ E-' U - - -- - - - a ~zr,~ P~ W n ~ ~. ~ \ ~ ~~ ~ ~ ~ ~ -- -- ~ w x w , ~ ~~ <c ~ a z ~~ < - - ~ 1 - ~ 1 ~ , _, c ~1 ---- ~ - - ~ - ~ - o ~ -cam - - ~~ -c~a ~ ~a - ~ - - -I p -~ ~ ~ p ~ C~; d ~ - _ ~~~~ ~ s O W I(J ( -I _ E 6 3 _ Q ~ Y~ ~ N k' _ `~~ ~ ~ ~ ~ O _ ~ ~ ~ x a ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 0 m~ - f 9 < ~ - - ~ ~ Gz. c~ Q ~ ~ v ~ Q ~ ~3 3 ~ H ~ ~ _~ n d ,z G:.. ~ ~ ~ ~ o ~' o z o .. w ' a m ~ Z r ~~ Z N era x ~ ~ ~ ~ ~« a a a ~ s ,~ ~ <~ :~ o ~ m ~ ~ ~ ~ ,_ ~ -- I ~ -_- - . ~~; m ~ ~ ~ _ m d - ~ ~ U 4 V R Y U ~ ~ • z 6 ~ _ ~ ~ Z Q 2 C k v7 ~. rn r~ W ~ o w 0 ~ a 0 i r- J !,~ ~ O - ~ [Z fJl r - ' L~ - -- - ( ) `r 1 ~ ~~ !'-~ _ b ~ ~~ ~ , - J ~ a ov ; Y 3 W ~ W O ~ Q J W U Q Z U Q !- a -~ _ ` O l 7 W x - 8 I U N O O - V ~ m Z ~ O \ !> ~ Z - -- - NI ~-I-- - - -- G ~~ y -- ~---- ~ -- ~ - - - - ~ _ r- ~ ~~ ~ U O y O i ~ Q ~ w ~ < ~ I ¢ ~ rc M % l/ 1-L J ; m I m 3 ~ ~ ~ ¢ 4 W Y F - m QQ W W ~ ~ a ~ 3 1 ~ ~ - ~ ~ ~ I u v ~~ 0 ~ ~ I w F ~^ ~ A p = ~ ~¢ W ~ ~ aa Z H ~ Y O ^O w s do3~~3 ~~~ c ~ o ~ 3~° w s~ Lake Newell Reservoir Resort Area Structure Plan ,,., Reservoir. Land within 30+ metres of the shoreline is considered to be Environmental Reserve land in the proposed development. Figure 4, Topographical Map, identifies the developable and non-developable areas in the Plan area (the elevations of the subject lands are numbered within the contour lines). The non-developable areas consist of lands that are either inside the EID 30m setback or within the 1:100 year floodplain. The proposed development will not encroach on the shoreline and will meet the required setbacks. Although no development is permitted within the non-developable areas, residents of the Lake Newell Reservoir Resort development can use this land as a natural walking path. The Lake Newell Reservoirs: Recreational Analysis and Concept Plans study completed by Woodbay Consulting in 1990 rated the upland (off-shore) areas in the Plan area as having a moderate potential for surface erosion hazard. A moderate hazard area is described in the Woodbay study as one having potential erosional and operational problems associated with normal surface activities or development, but which can be significantly reduced by proper planning and operational techniques. The geotechnical investigation completed in 2002 by Soil and Environ. Consults on the Plan area outlines recommendations for residential development, including natural moisture content of clays, site preparation and fill content, foundations, excavations, foundation concrete, bearing capacity, slope stability, pavement design, and road subgrade construction. Following the recommendations in the geotechnical investigation will mitigate the concerns raised in the Woodbay study. 2. S Existing Land Uses There are 160 existing registered lots within the two developed subdivisions located on the west bank of Greenwald Inlet. Construction has been ongoing since 1992, with single-family detached homes, ranging in size and style, being built to typical urban development standards. Figure 6 shows the existing land use designations for the Plan area lands. The majority of the land along the shoreline is dedicated for residential purposes, with larger tracts of land in the north and southeast portions of the Plan area designated for resort commercial use. T'he majority of the proposed land uses are consistent with their current land use designation. The sites listed in Table 1 below, however, will have different uses requiring a land use amendment, although the proposed uses are still consistent with the overall area's development philosophy. ,~- 7 1 _ e N 4 r, z h _ // ~ ~~: ~ ~f- OC ~ ,.. R - - .. .~ o y ~ x G. ~ ,. •~ s J y 3 2 ~ 3W V':~ i~ v ~ w E a ~, 3 of < _ I. ~ O ~ C.7 ~, v ~~ ~3 ~ < 3 _ O Z ~ e - i ~ g OJ _ ~ ~ c~ Z = 3 ~ ~ O > in z p z O Z O_ O i 6 w .bii ~ ~ G = m \V ~.~ I V~r , ~ F (~_ J ~ ) _+i ~ ~ \, N _.__ r ~_ ~-` ~ ~ ~ ~~ ~ ~ ~ ~-~, -~ _ ~ j ~ ~ ~ ~ -- ~- , r ~~ ~~ ~ ~ ~~ _. T~ tr_,~ ~ ~- -=- _ ~ . - - _ 1 _~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~. ~ ` ~ _ /~ ~ i' ~ 1 _ i^ f -..~` ., ~~~ ~ - ~,) 1. S ~(/,. l I' Y- W LL c -~ ~_ W -~ , ~` ~t-:~ ~, ~ ~~- j . --, 5~ ~ z w ~ s ~ ~~l r ~# I l 1~ / / _ ~ ~ t ~ _, ,_ - (~ / ~-~- ' ~ _ ,~ ~ y ~~ Ir `,v ~ ~\ ~ I ~> J a" ~'~- ~ ~~ / -~.ti~ _~~ - , . ,, ~ _ == - - - ~ i ~ni -- \ ~_.__-._ W i 0 Z ~ d Q / ~ _ I F~ ~ _ J O _ ~ - v a v v o~ '. / z ~ 'L ¢ i ~ Q ~ ac r J ` Z f -I ~ Z a "' ~ 3 li ~_ ~ o W C ^ ' ~ Cn VJ ~ _ s ~ - o~/ Ian ~/ `/~ z s W ¢ Q Q Q Q - o ¢ r i~. y ~/ -~ ~X ) ~~; cn n ~~ w ~. ~ - 1 ~~ ~J N~N L.f..~ V Gs. l o ~ g k a $s _ ~ S - - ~_ O ~ L~ z z r, m Z Z 1~ i w C~ i ~ g ~~~ ^ (~ * - s s. Z p ~ W ~ ~ ~ Z o z s ~ __ K~ p ~ e ~ ~ ~ w - _ ~ zg ~ . G" T. ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ _ ~ y < o w ~ _ = Q `~ _ ~ ~ V v> ` f. Q U Z ~ Q ~ ~ O ~_ J T O~ ° ao W C..J Q ~ ' Z ~ ~ ~ ~ 3 ~ 3 0 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ p j ~ N ~ ~ ~ i o U d 'z w z ~ ~ N ~ ~ r - ~ ~ ~ ~_ m ~ ~ ~ < y Qoo a m z~, ~ o J J o x .. ~ W ~ o~ m ~~ n I ~; i rn ~` ~ LEI ~ r m = - -~ O ~ ~ c-.i I g -{ ~ Lake Newell Reservoir Resort Area Structure Plan ,,.,, Table 1-Land Use Amendment Sites (See Figures 6 and 7) Location Ex~stl~g ~auil Peuposed Use A~e~dzt _ Use _ ~ . Pt. NE 12-18-15-W4M Resort Residential Multi- RC to RR2 Commercial famil Land in the NW 7-18-14-W4M Resort Golf course RC to PS Commercial Land in the NW 7-18-14-W4M Residential Open space RR2 to PS Multi-famil 2.0 acre site in the NW 7-18-14- Resort Driving range RC to PS W4M Commercial 15.8 acre site in NW 7-18-14- Resort Campground RC to PS W4M Commercial Small area in NW 7-18-14-W4M Resort Residential Multi- RC to RR2 on northeast side of Plan area Commercial famil Land in NE 6-18-14-W4M Resort Residential Multi- RC to RR2 Commercial famil Land in NE 6-18-14-W4M Residential Park and RR2 to PS Multi-family recreational s ace Pt. NW 7-18-14-W4M, Residential Residential RR2 to RR1 Pt. SW 7-18-14-4, Multi-family Single-family Pt. NW 6-18-14-4, & Pt. NE 6-18-14-4 2.6 Adjacent Land Uses Figure 6 shows the land uses adjacent to the Plan area. Most of the surrounding land is designated as Agricultural District (A) in the County of Newell Land Use Bylaw and is currently used for grazing. The EID owned lands outside the Plan area are mainly designated as Resort Commercial District. These lands are currently undeveloped, but they maybe developed in the future with recreational and residential uses. Specifically, the EID plans to develop 70 residential units in the future on the remaining portion of the NE 1-18-15-W4M (this area is labelled the EID 70 Units land in Figures 2, 5, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, and 13). If the EID chooses to develop their lands, a separate ASP or an amendment to this Plan will be required. The proposed development in this ASP is compatible with all of the adjacent land uses and land use districts in the area. Furthermore, the development has no major impacts on the surrounding agricultural uses other than the increased traffic in the area. generated by the new residential homes. Finally, the existing land uses in and outside the Plan Area will not inhibit development in the Plan Area. 8 Lake Newell Reservoir Resort Area Structure Plan ~:: 3.0 Natural Features 3.1 Topography and Drainage The topography of the Plan area is generally level with gently rolling hills. There is a gradual increase in elevation from the Lakeshore out to the Plan area boundaries. Slopes in the area generally range from 6-9% and local relief is generally less than 15 metres. Drainage in the Plan area generally flows towards the Reservoir. 3.2 Soils and Geology Geographically, the site is part of the "Southern Plains" physiographic region or the Kininvie Plain physiographic district of the Alberta Plains. The Plan area is underlain by cretaceous soft rock comprised of weakly consolidated sedimentary rock (Avocet Environmental Inc. Wildlife Risk Survey, 2). Surface soil within the majority of the Plan area is described as Glacier/fluvial sand and silty clay loam texture. 3.3 Lake Newell Irrigation Reservoir The Lake Newell Reservoir, the Reservoir for the Eastern Irrigation District, is one of the largest man-made lakes in Alberta. The Reservoir is approximately 14.8 km long, 6.5 km wide, and 20 m at is deepest point, with a surface area of 67 km2 and a shoreline of 70 km {Woodbay study, 16 & 22). A variety of birds, fish, and wildlife make the waters and surrounding lands of the Lake Newell Reservoir their home. Water enters Lake Newell Reservoir through two canals, one at the northwest corner and the other in the extreme southwest. Several other intermittent drainage courses surrounding the Reservoir also direct water into the Reservoir. Water flows out of the Reservoir through the southeast and northeast canals. Eastern Irrigation District controls the water levels in the Reservoir. The water is used for farming and agricultural operations in the region as well as to supply the drinking water for the Town of Brooks. The EID also controls a setback area around the bed and shore of the Reservoir. Greenwald Inlet, the narrow, peninsula-shaped water area that the Plan area surrounds, has a water surface area of approximately 200 acres (80.9 hectares) with an average depth of 2.4 - 3.6 metres {8-12 feet) (Greenwald Inlet East ASP, 1). 3.3.1 Water Quality According to conversations with the EID, the water quality of the Lake Newell Reservoir is good for drinking water. The Reservoir is also considered to be suitable for sport and commercial fishing. Officially, the EID has no comments (see attached letter from the EID in Appendix C) about the quality of the water for recreational activities. 9 Lake Newell Reservoir Resort Area Structure Plan .-- 3. S Historical Resources Overview and Impact Assessment In accordance with the recommendation of Alberta Community Development, a Historical Resources Impact Assessment on the Plan area lands outside of the original 1992 Historical Resources Impact study area and a Stage 1 mitigation on sites EdOx-13 and 16 was carried out in October 2002 by Eugene Gryba. The report concluded that excavations at sites EdOx-13 and 16 did not yield any finds significant enough to warrant further (Stage II) excavations. The report recommended that "no further archaeological attention for any of the three proposed extension areas, or for sites EcOx-18, EdOx-13, EdOx-16, and EdOx-28" is needed for the Lake Newell Reservoir Resort residential development. After reviewing the Gryba report, Alberta Community Development has sent a letter dated December 3, 2002 to Planning Protocol stating that their requirements with regard to archaeological sites EcOx-18, EdOx-28, EdOx-13 and EdOx-16 have been satisfactorily addressed and from an historical resources perspective development may proceed. (Appendix B contains a copy of the December 3, 20021etter from Alberta Community Development.) 3.6 Environmental Site Assessment A Phase 1 Environmental Assessment was completed on the Plan area lands by Soil and Enviro. Consultant Inc. in December 2002. The Phase 1 report concluded that no hazards or contamination requiring further attention were encountered during the investigation. 3.7 Geotechnicallnvestigation A geotechnical investigation was completed on the Plan area lands by Soil and Enviro. Consultant Inc. in December 2002. The report states that due to the site's sandy soil conditions and proximity to the Reservoir, conventional septic fields are not suitable, but a sewage lagoon or lift station system to the Town of Brooks maybe used in place of the present septic holding tank disposal system. In addition to sewage disposal, the report contains development recommendations regarding natural moisture content of clays, site preparation and fill content, foundations, excavations, foundation concrete, bearing capacity, slope stability, pavement design, and road subgrade construction. The report recommends that all developments be limited to a slope no steeper than 4 Horizontal: 1 Vertical (25% slope), unless the slope is modified by leveling or retaining walls. Following the recommendations outlined in this report will mitigate some of the major natural constraints identified with residential development in the Plan area. 3.8 Significant Vegetation Species The native vegetation of the upland areas around the Lake Newell Reservoir is commonly called "short grass prairie", predominately low-growing herb communities which typically do not exceed 30 cm in height (Woodbay study, 15). The most common species in the upland areas are blue grama grass and clubmoss. Other less common species are needle-and-thread grass, pasture sage, wheat grasses, and June grass (Woodbay study, 15). Plant species typically found in the emergent and depressed prairie areas near the northern tip of Greenwald Inlet include Canada .-- 11 Lake Newell Reservoir Resort Area Structure Plan .-~ thistle, western dock, timothy, goldenrod species, bulrushes, and willow species (Tourism, Environment and Sustainability: AConcept for Greenwald Inlet, 36). 3.9 Wildlife Species In 1999, Avocet Environmental Inc. completed a wildlife study on an area of land that covered the majority of the Plan area, excepting the developed lands located in the southwest portion of the Plan area. One of the main focuses of the study was to locate Burrowing Owl nest sites. The Burrowing Owl is listed as an endangered species in Canada and Alberta.. The results of the wildlife study were that a total of 31 bird, 2 mammal, and 1 amphibian species were seen or heard during the walking surveys conducted throughout the study area on Apri125, 1999. Some of these species included the: Red-necked Grebe, American White Pelican, Double- crested Comorant, Canada Goose, Mallard, Northern Pintail, Long-billed Curlew, California Gull, Horned Lark, Western Meadowlark, and Pronghorn. Of the species encountered, only the Long-billed Curlew is considered to be "at risk" by provincial and federal wildlife agencies. The walking survey indicated that all or part of the territories of up to 6 breeding pairs of curlews occurred in the study area. The only other "at risk" species identified by the wildlife study as likely to breed on the site are Sprague's Pit and the Short-eared Owl. The wildlife study concluded that although development in the study area would result in the loss or modification of prairie habitat for these three bird species, on a ,.._ regional basis this represented only 0.05% of this habitat found in the County of Newell, and so the impact to breeding populations of these species was minor. Some other notable mammals not observed in the wildlife study but known to occur in the overall Lake Newell Reservoir area include the: Pygmy Shrew, Striped Skunk, Least Weasel, American Badger, Coyote, Red Fox, Richardson's Ground Squirrel, Lease Chipmunk, Little Brown Bat, Northern Pocket Gopher, Deer Mouse, Muskrat, Whitetail Jackrabbit, and Mule Deer. Alberta Fish and Wildlife have designated one site in the southwest corner of Lake Newell Reservoir as a key wildlife area -Pelican Island. 'This site represents an important breeding ground for White Pelicans (Woodbay study, 28}. It is also used as nesting ground by cormorants and gulls. There is an 800 m restricted zone around the island and boaters are not permitted close to the island. Other islands in the lake provide important habitat for Great Blue Herons and cormorants (Woodbay study, 28). The northern pike is a popular sports fish in the Lake Newell Reservoir. Walleye, pickerel, and rainbow trout are caught on an infrequent basis. Lake Whitefish is the main commercial fish species in the Lake Newell Reservoir. 12 Lake Newell Reservoir Resort Area Structure Plan .- 4.0 Policies Effecting the Plan 4.1 County of Newell No. 4 Municipal Development Plan The policies contained in Section 7 -Natural Resources and the Environment of the County of Newell Municipal Development Plan that are most applicable to the proposed development and Plan area lands are listed below: Policy 7.1 'The County shall endeavour to protect environmentally significant areas and other significant natural areas and resources from inappropriate development. Policy 7.1.1 'The County shall consult with other agencies in the development of management plans which integrate land use, development, and recreational planning activities, and take into account environmentally significant areas. Policy 7.1.4 Development in or adjacent to river valleys shall take into consideration slope stability and soil characteristics in order to minimize adverse environmental impacts. Policy 7.1.5 The County shall protect significant recreation features from inappropriate development, recognizing their existing and future recreation and tourism capability. Policy 7.2 Development within floodplains shall be regulated to protect these natural areas and to minimize potential flood damage. Policy 7.2.3 The subdivision of land shall not be permitted in river floodplains below the one- in-one hundred year floodline. Policy 7.3 Subdivision and development on shorelands should be compatible with the surrounding environment. Policy 7.3.1 The County shall carefully assess any proposed development of shorelands, taking into consideration the environmental sensitivity of such areas. Policy 7.3.2 T'he County shall consider the adoption of area structure plans to implement lake shore management policies and regulate development adjacent to the Lake Newell Reservoir. Policy 7.3.3 Development on shorelands should occur in a manner which ensures soil stability and water quality, and protects the aesthetic and scenic qualities of the area. Policy 7.3.5 Development shall not be located on land that maybe flooded by Reservoir waters, or on land which is or may be adversely affected by Reservoir erosion or ~- bank failure. 13 Lake Newell Reservoir Resort Area Structure Plan ,,... Policy 7.3.6 The County shall ensure that public access to regionally significant recreation areas, shorelands, and water bodies is protected and enhanced in a manner which minimizes conflicts with other uses. 4.2 County of Newell No. 4 Land Use Bylaw Most of the Plan area lands are or will be designated according to the following County of Newell Land Use Districts: • Resort Residential District (RR1) • Resort Multi-Family Residential District (RR2) • Resort Commercial District (RC) • Public/Semi Public Open Space District (PS) The permitted uses of the Resort Residential District (RR1) are single-family dwellings and accessory buildings, and discretionary uses include moved-in buildings, parks and recreation facilities, and public and quasi-public buildings. The minimum width of lots in the RR1 district when serviced by water distribution and wastewater collection systems is 12 m. The permitted uses of the Resort Multi-Family Residential District (RR2) are multi-family dwelling units and accessory buildings, and discretionary uses include moved-in buildings, parks and recreation facilities, and public and Quasi-public buildings. The minimum area of lots when ~^ serviced by water distribution and wastewater collection systems is 150 m2 for interior lots and 186 m2 for corner lots. The permitted uses of the Resort Commercial District are accessory buildings and park and recreational facilities, and discretionary uses include hotels, marina facilities, motels, offices, restaurants, retail stores, and service stations. The minimum width of lots in this district with water and sewage collection system is also 12 m. The permitted uses of the Public/Semi Public Open Space District are parks and recreation facilities, picnic areas, public beaches, and utilities, and discretionary uses include concessions, golf courses, and parking areas. 4.3 Greenwald Inlet East Area Structure Plan The study area of the Greenwald Inlet East ASP, adopted by Council on September 23, 1999, covered the east half of the Plan area in this document. The goals and policies in the Greenwald ASP are consistent with the goals and policies of this Plan. Overall, the proposed land use concept of the Greenwald ASP is similar to the proposed land use concept of this Plan for the same area. However, because there are some differences between the two ASP's, this Plan will supersede the Greenwald Inlet East ASP. Having one ASP in place, rather than two, will simplify the future subdivision and development process. 14 Lake Newell Reservoir Resort Area Structure Plan r-- 5.0 Other Relevant Documents S.1 Lake Newell Reservoirs: Recreational Analysis and Concept Plan The Lake Newell Reservoirs: Recreational Analysis and Concept Plan study, completed in 1990 by Woodbay Consulting Group Ltd., was commissioned by the Eastern Irrigation District to access the recreation potential of the Reservoir and stimulate development of the lands surrounding the Reservoir. Major elements of the study included: 1) an examination and inventory of the natural and man-made resources; 2) an assessment of the capability and sustainability of the shorelands and water surface areas associated with the Reservoir; 3) an identification of Reservoir shoreline opportunities both capable and suitable for supporting recreation and tourism activities and of providing the EID with increased operating revenues; 4) an examination of how the recreation potential of the Reservoir is effected by drawdown and the type of problems associated with different Reservoir levels; 5) alternative recreation plans that identify land and water surface proposals for specific sites. The Woodbay study is referred to in different relevant sections throughout this Plan. Section 3.0 - Lake Newell RecreationlTourism Concept Plan of the Woodbay study identifies an area along the western shoreline of Greenwald Inlet (roughly corresponding with the western portion of the Plan area lands) named the Greenwald Lakeshore Residential Development as a secondary development node. The concept behind this area was for a small residential community along the western shorelands of Greenwald Inlet with recreational and lake amenities. 5.2 Tourism, Environment and Sustainability: AConcept for Greenwald Inlet The Tourism, Environment and Sustainability: AConcept for Greenwald Inlet report was completed in 1990 by the University of Calgary Faculty of Environmental Design for the Eastern Irrigation District. The purpose of the Tourism report was to propose a Concept Plan for a recreational tourism development for Greenwald Inlet. The Concept Plan proposed permanent residential houses on 15m by 40m lots, seasonal accommodation with leased cottages on small lots, a campground, a commerciaUcommunity center with hostel, cafes, and environmental education facilities, and a full service marina. Section 2.2 of the Tourism report suggests a variety of architectural design concepts, which may be useful to a housing developer as a basis upon which to create specific architectural guidelines for homes in the Plan area. Elements covered include roof shapes, scale, details, materials, colour, signage, and illumination. Section 2.3 of the report provides recommendations on sustainable prairie landscaping. Section 3.1 of the Tourism report recommends recreational activities and sites for these activities that are suitable for Greenwald Inlet. Proposed activities include swimming, canoeing and kayaking, windsurfing, sailing, boating, camping, playing fields, walking, and golf. .- 15 Lake Newell Reservoir Resort Area Structure Plan ,.- 5.3 Environmentally Significant Areas of the County of Newell The Environmentally Significant Areas of the County of Newell report was completed in 1991 by Cottonwood Consultants Ltd. for the Southeast Regional Planning Commission and Alberta Forestry Land and Wildlife. The purpose of the study was to develop an information base on environmentally significant areas that would be useful for planning in the County. The objectives of the study were to provide an inventory of environmentally significant areas, evaluate the sensitivity of the areas, and develop management strategies for the areas. The Lake Newell Reservoir and its surrounding shoreline and upland lands (including the Plan area) are identified in the report as a provincially significant Environmentally Significant Area. Some of the major features of the Lake Newell Reservoir site as noted in the report include large reservoirs, marshes, and upland mixed grassland, nesting islands for gulls, Double-crested Cormorants, and American White Pelicans, Great Blue Heron colonies, shorebird staging area, threatened birds including Burrowing Owls, and rare plants. The report provides the following management considerations for the Lake Newell site: relative stability in the water levels and maintenance of adjacent natural habitats will be good for waterfowl, a diversity of grazing regimes will maintain a variety of native plants and animals, cultivation reduces wildlife productivity of the grasslands, and American White Pelicans and Great Blue Herons are sensitive to disturbance during their nesting season. ,•- 16 Lake Newell Reservoir Resort Area Structure Plan .--- 6.0 The Plan The County of Newell acknowledges the potential for recreational activity and residential development in the Plan area. This Area Structure Plan is a statutory planning document that addresses specific planning issues for the proposed development of the Plan area. 6.l The Plan Area The subject lands that comprise the Plan area are located along the shoreline and upland areas surrounding Greenwald Inlet, apeninsula-shaped extension of water at the northern tip of the Lake Newell Reservoir. The boundaries of the Plan area are clearly shown in Figure 1. The northern boundary of the Plan area is Twp. Road 182. 6.2 Goals and Objectives The Lake Newell Reservoir Resort ASP has the following major goals: 1. To outline a land use strategy to guide development of the Plan area in a comprehensive, complimentary, and integrated manner. 2. To increase public access to and recreational use of Greenwald Inlet. 3. To protect natural resources, natural processes, and sensitive environmental areas in the Plan area and the surrounding lands. l" 4. To provide an abundance of park and natural open space for the use and enjoyment of residents and visitors 5. To propose an internal transportation network that meets or exceeds the County of Newell's roadway standards and fits in with the external road system. 6. To propose servicing solutions for water, sewage, and stormwater that meets or exceeds the standards of the County of Newell No. 4. 7. To identify areas in the Plan area which will require a land use amendment from their current designation to realize the proposed land use concept. 6.3 The Plan Vision The Lake Newell Reservoir Resort Development will be a resort community with a diversity of housing styles and recreational activities. It will be a place for year round living, and a place for seasonal living. The development is expected to attract new residents from the Brooks area, as well as from the major centers in and around Calgary, Edmonton, and Southern Saskatchewan. Families wishing to enjoy a modern lifestyle in a quiet, rural setting, and recreational enthusiasts that want to enjoy outdoor activities such as sailing, fishing, water skiing, boating, wind surfing, skating, cross-County skiing, walking, swimming, skating, camping, and golf, will be attracted to this development. When completed, the Lake Newell Reservoir Resort development (in the Plan area) and the EID future units will total a maximum of 700 residential units. This 700 total breaks down into the '"' following categories: 17 Lake Newell Reservoir Resort Area Structure Plan ~-- 1) 470 proposed new resort single-family units and multi-family units in the Lake Newell Reservoir development; 2) 160 existing, registered lots in the Plan area; 3) 70 future EID units outside the Plan area. (Note: Although the land on which the 70 EID units are to be developed is not part of the ASP Plan area, the 70 EID units are referenced in this document because they are included in the 700 units that will be serviced by the Town of Brooks' sewage system) A variety of recreational opportunities will be available to both residents and visitors of Lake Newell Reservoir Resort. Water based recreational activities include fishing, bird watching, swimming, water-skiing, sailing, canoeing, and windsurfing. In addition to the lake amenities, a 9-hole golf course complete with a clubhouse and a driving range will provide guests and residents with a prairie golfing experience. A convenience store and gas station site will supply the local commercial needs of the residents and guests, and an amusement and games facility site will deliver some fun and entertainment. The Lake Newell Reservoir Resort development will provide an abundance of green space in the form of municipal reserve lands, environmental reserve, and public/semi-public open space. Indeed, 43.7% of the Plan area is used as some type of open space, including natural open space, environmental reserve along the shoreline, common maintained green space, a golf course, and a park with recreational facilities. The different green spaces are linked throughout the community by green pathways. Residents and guests will be able to enjoy a quiet, sublime, beautiful walk along the shoreline of the Reservoir in the Plan area without encountering roads. .- 18 Lake Newell Reservoir Resort Area Structure Plan ~- 7.0 Proposed Land Use This section describes the proposed land use districts, development concept, and general policies for the Lake Newell Reservoir Resort ASP that will be used by the County of Newell to assess the merits of land use and subdivision applications within the Plan area. The Lake Newell Reservoir Resort Development will include the following types of land use districts: • Resort Residential District (RR1) • Resort Multi-Family Residential District (RR2) • Resort Commercial District (RC) • Public/Semi-Public Open Space District (PS} • Campground (Land Use Pending) 7.1 Land Use Overview Figure 7 shows the proposed land use plan for the Plan area. Overall, approximately 37.1% of the total Plan area is used for residential development, 19.4% is Environmental Reserve land, 11.6% is dedicated as Municipal Reserve (14.3% of Total Plan Area - E.R. Area), 12.7% is for a golf course and public park/recreational uses, 3.9% is for commercial, 2.8% is for a campground, and 12.5% is for roads. Table 2 -Proposed Land Uses Lsnd Use Perc~tatge ~#' Total Area Residential Development 37.1 Environmental Reserve 19.4 Munici al Reserve 11.6 Golf Course & Public Park/Recreational Uses 12.7 Commercial 3.9 Cam round 2 g Roads 12.5 TOTAL 100.0 The total number of residential units proposed in the Plan area is 630. At full build out, the gross residential density of the Plan area (total area less environmental reserve) is 1.4 units per acre. Although the total number of units in the Plan area will not exceed 630, this ASP will permit the units assigned to each block in Table 5 to be transferred from one block to another at the subdivision stage subject to market conditions. It should be stressed that the number of units assigned to each block in Table 5 can only be increased by a maximum of 20% of the proposed number of units at the time of ASP adoption. 19 f I I _;~ I ~ t I F _ r l I _ a m ~ ~ ° i ~ g ~~ C-- I - '_- ~ 1 - - ~ L_ _ ~ .... ~, i _ i ~ ~ -~ ~\ ~ ,~\~ ~ x ~ i - t _ s \ \~\\ L ~ l j, > ,.., ~~ i ~ %~ , ~ '~ r ( ..' _ ~ ~` ~ z , ~~~/rte \\ _ ~ ~~~ , 1'r ~ I rn cn m r. y _ i ~ ~~ ~ Kg ~ r ~ ,.- ~- ~ ~ F - .~ ~ n s I ;. ~ O r. ~S ' _ ~.~ r~ - /~ ~- ~ ~ ~~ ---~ ~, ~r~'~ ~ / -~ ~ ~ - ~` z ~ ~ I i - ~~ - ? i ~ C >1 --~ I I -~ ~ ., H S P / ~ ` m m z t I} m m m e l \ 1J ~/~ ~-j Z m O n z m 3 m m m O v a i ~ c~3 ~ Z ~ _ ~ ~' i~ ,~..~ =cs _. _ ° g ~ p ~ ~ 0 0 0 n A D A O ~ ~ ~~ - ~ ~ N , 7 1 Y C- K ~ ~ ~n >y O O v y ~ - O ~ C A A D Z ~ Y m s; ~ ~ m a~ ~ . ~~ '~ r ~ O ~~ A - < (~ 3 - ° m ~ _~ ~ Y <z~' R = ~ N ~~ iS: ~1 /~+ A A N ]I .TI m Z A A m N ~ _ ~ _ ~ g _ - ~ • _ 0 - - O O 3 ~ ~ - ` ~~ . ~~~~ o m Lake Newell Reservoir Resort Area Structure Plan ,^ 7.1.1 East Development The natural rolling topography, elevation difference between the high water level and the offshore lands, and beautiful westerly views overlooking the Reservoir make the eastern side of the Plan area suitable for large, country-style estate homes. The majority of the housing in the East Development area will be single-detached housing. 'The lots adjacent to the shoreline will range from '/4 acre to '/2 acre in size and will have large estate quality homes on them. The offshore, internal units in the East Development area will have the largest residential lots in the entire Plan area, '/z acre to 2 acres, with medium and large size homes permitted. Overall, the East Development area will accommodate approximately 190 residential units. Nonetheless, the Plan allows for up to 38 more units to be transferred into the East Development Area (See Section 7.1 and Section 13.1). Architectural controls specifying minimum house size, protecting lake views, providing for compatibility of housing types, regulating residential landscaping, maintaining a visually attractive shoreline, and other design considerations will be established by the developer for these single-detached housing units at subdivision stage. There are also two small multi-family development sites proposed at the northern end of the East Development area in Block 10 and Block 11. These sites combined will contain approximately 30 units which will be appropriately designed to be compatible with the surrounding single- family detached homes. 'This will be ensured through a restrictive covenant placed on the land titles by the developer at the subdivision stages. The developer will initially enforce these controls. Once a Resident's Association is created, the responsibility for enforcing the controls will pass from the developer to the Resident's Association at a later date. It should be noted that the Resident's Association will be created once the development is commenced. 7.1.2 West Development The majority of the housing development on the western side of the Plan area will also be single- detached housing, but lot sizes and home sizes will generally be smaller than in the East Development area. When fully built out, the West Development area will accommodate approximately 440 residential units. This total includes the 160 registered lots in the existing White Pelican View (Block 1) and Blue Heron Subdivisions (Block 4) and the 280 proposed units for Block 2, Block 3, Block 5, Block 6, and Block 9 (See Figure 13 and Table 5) . Starting in the southwest corner, the possible units developed in Block 5 (directly west of the large marina) would consist of large, urban style lots with single-family detached homes on them. Block 5 will be developed as part of Phase 1. The west portion of this Block will be used for R.V. storage. The R.V. storage will be appropriately fenced and screened from adjacent uses. A multi-family site with 50 units is proposed in Block 3, which is directly north of the Marina. Parking and landscaped open space will be located at the front of the site, closest to Lake Newell Resort Road. Townhouse style housing is envisioned for this site. The proposed residential development in Block 2, located east of the multi-family site and south of the existing Blue Heron subdivision, will consist of 50 feet by 100 feet urban style lots with '~ medium to large sized single-detached homes. 20 Lake Newell Reservoir Resort Area Structure Plan .-- The two proposed residential blocks located north of the Blue Heron Subdivision and south of the proposed golf course (Blocks 8 & 9) will also be comprised of 50 by 100 feet urban style lots with single-detached homes. However, unlike the other residential developments, smaller homes will be permitted on the internal lots in these blocks. This type of house size would be more typical of a summer cottage or second residence. For aesthetic reasons and to screen these blocks from surrounding development, some visual screening will be completed along the portion of the western collector road (Lake Newell Resort Road) adjacent to these blocks, and also around the perimeter of the blocks. The lots adjacent to the shoreline in these two blocks will accommodate medium to large sized single-detached homes. For each of the different residential blocks in the West Development area, architectural controls specifying minimum house size, protecting lake views and maintaining the shoreline, residential landscaping controls, and other design requirements will be completed at the subdivision stage. 7.1.3 Inlet (North) Development The North Development area (Block 10) is the major recreational and commercial component of the Lake Newell Reservoir Resort development. Roughly half of this area is designated as Public Open Space District fora 9-hole golf course and driving range. Approximately 15.8 acres of the North Development area will be used as a campground. The location of the campground is ideal as it is suitable for the planting of trees, and includes ,-. natural berming and shallow water appropriate for swimming. Furthermore, due to the campground's distance from the west collector road and the topography, only a small part of this campground will be visible from the west collector road. There is some natural screening around the campground site, which should be augmented by additional screening where necessary. To address concerns regarding water fluctuations and soil suitability a supplemental geotechnical update and a hydrological investigation will be conducted for the campground. The particular land use district for this campground will be determined at the redesignation stage as Public/Semi-Public Open Space (PS). The sewage volumes for this site are estimated at 10 year- round residential units (See Section 11.1}. The North Development area contains three Resort Commercial sites, one for a Golf Clubhouse, one for a grocery store and gas station establishment, and one for some other recreational commercial use. These commercial sites are described in more detail in Section 7.3. 7.2 Residential Development 7.2.1 Resort Residential 1 (RR1) The purpose of the RRl District is to accommodate low-density single-family detached dwellings in resort settings. Each block of RR1 land will have a residential density of between 4.0 units per developable acre to a maximum of 8.0 units per developable acre. These figures are calculated based on the minimum width of 12 metres for RRl lots with water distribution and 21 Lake Newell Reservoir Resort Area Structure Plan ~,,, sewage collection in the County of Newell Land Use Bylaw (and assuming a minimum lot depth of 32 metres, which is not defined in the Land Use Bylaw). In addition to the two existing subdivisions that are designated as RRl District, two other blocks in the Plan area are proposed for RRl designation as shown in Figure 7. The first block is Block 2, which is located directly south of the existing Blue Heron Subdivision. The second block is Block 12, which is found on the east side of the Plan area. The proposed residential development in these blocks will meet all the County of Newell Land Use Bylaw requirements. 7.2.2 Resort Residential 2 (RR2) The purpose of the RR2 District is to allow for multi-family development in resort settings. The density of RR2 areas will range from approximately 2.0 units per developable acre to a maximum density of 20.0 units per developable acre. These figures are calculated based on the minimum unit area size for RR2 lots with water distribution and sewage collection in the County of Newell Land Use Bylaw. Notably, none of the RR2 areas in the Plan area will reach the maximum density. In this Plan, the RR2 District accommodates a mix of single-family detached housing areas and multi-family sites in areas next to active recreational amenities such as parks and beaches. The quantity of land proposed for RR2 District in this ASP will be proportionate to the quantity of land currently zoned as RR2. The majority of the RR2 designated residential areas in the Plan area will have single-family dwellings on urban lots similar to the RRl areas. There are, ~' however, three proposed multi-residential sites in the Plan area. Townhouses are envisioned for these multi-residential sites. It should be emphasized that no apartment buildings will be permitted in the Plan area and this will be ensured through a restrictive covenant and/or architectural controls at the subdivision stage. The monitoring and regulation of these architectural controls will initially be the responsibility of the developer. This responsibility will pass on to the Residents Association once it has been created, and not the County. The RR2 Districts proposed in this Plan will be designed for emergency vehicle accessibility, to be assessed at subdivision stage. The proposed RR2 areas will meet or exceed the parking requirements associated with the development density. 7.3 Resort Commercial (RC) The purpose of the RC District is to allow for commercial development compatible with resort- recreational type development. There are four RC sites proposed for the Plan area, which serve the food, accommodation, and recreational needs of local resident's and day users of the Lake Newell Reservoir. Higher level goods and services will be available in the Town of Brooks. The first commercial site proposed in the Plan area is a 9.8 acre marina site (Block 6) with marina facilities, a small lodge, and restaurant located in the southwest portion of the Plan area. The lodge will accommodate visitors and these accommodation units are included as part of the 208 units allocated to Phase 1. There is also a 1,000-gallon above ground fuel storage tank with .-, associated piping and a fuel dispensing facility on this site, which was installed in 1994. The 22 Lake Newell Reservoir Resort Area Structure Plan ,,_._ developer or private operator of the dock will upgrade or expand the existing public docking facilities on the EID owned environmental reserve land adjacent to the shoreline. The dock will be constructed in accordance with building code specifications, and with the approval and consultation of the EID, Alberta Environment, and any other relevant government departments. The second commercial site is a smaller 2.0 acre parcel located at the northwest corner of the Plan area in Block 10, at the intersection of the existing Lake Newell Resort Road and Twp. Road 182. The proposed concept for this site is for a local grocery/convenience store with a service station. The sewage volumes for this site are estimated at one year round residential unit {See Section 11.1). The third commercial site is a 1.5 acre Golf Clubhouse site located at the north end of the Plan area in Block 10, equipped with apro-shop, administration offices for the golf course, and a cafe/restaurant. The sewage volumes for this site are estimated at one year round residential unit (See Section 11.1). 'The fourth commercial site is a 5.0 acre parcel located in Block 10 at the intersection of the proposed eastern collector road and Twp. Road 182. The proposed use for this site is a commerciaUrecreational activity complementary to the golf course and campground. For example, an amusement facility with mini-golf and batting cage or similar such uses maybe appropriate. There might be a need for a Laundromat facility here also to service residents and visitors. The sewage volumes for this site are estimated at one year round residential unit (See Section 11.1). All commercial structures will be designed to blend in with the architectural style of adjacent recreational and residential development. Adequate buffering, fencing, and landscaping are required where needed to ensure the aesthetic compatibility of the commercial site with adjacent development. Landscaping should use plants native to the region. 7.4 Public/Semi-Public Open Space (PS) The golf course and driving range will be designed to conserve the natural prairie landscape, minimize the ecological disruption of the area, and to ensure the safety of those using adjacent facilities. Pursuant to this goal, some general policies for the design of the golf course might include the following: conserve important wildlife habitats, integrate natural features, minimize the size of maintained grassy areas, such as tees, greens, and portions of fairways, minimize the creation of new hazards and contours (e.g. sand traps), minimize fertilizer use, and provide appropriate fencing and screening between adjacent uses. The Plan proposes a large square-shaped area of Public Open Space land situated in the middle of the residential subdivision in Block 13, in the southeast portion of the Plan area (in the East Development area). This area, maintained by the proposed Resident's Association, will be a public recreational area with a soccer field, ball diamond, barbecue facilities, playground facilities, and open natural park area. It should be noted that none of the areas designated as Public/Semi-Public Open Space will be dedicated for Municipal Reserve. 23 Lake Newell Reservoir Resort Area Structure Plan .~-- 8.0 Reserve Lands 8.1 Municipal Reserve Figure 8 shows the municipal reserve lands in the Plan area in accordance with the requirements of the Municipal Government Act and the County of Newell Land Use Bylaw. According to Section 666 of the Municipal Government Act, up to 10% of the parcel of land less the land required as environmental reserve maybe provided for municipal reserve lands. In this Plan, about 14% of the gross Plan area (total Plan area minus the environmental reserve areas) is dedicated as Municipal Reserve to the County of Newell for open space, recreational use and pedestrian access. Municipal reserve lands will be dedicated to the County of Newell phase by phase as each subdivision plan is registered with Alberta Land Titles. The developer will need to establish a Resident's Association for the Lake Newell Reservoir Resort development to maintain the municipal reserve lands and utility systems within the Plan area. The small municipal reserve areas located between and among the housing units will be maintained and manicured by the Resident's Association. The green pathways linking the various municipal reserve areas with the environmental reserve shoreline area will also be maintained by the Resident's Association. The larger Municipal Reserve areas in the Plan area, however, will be left in their natural condition, and will serve the Plan area as natural public parks. The County will not be responsible for maintaining the Municipal Reserve lands in the Lake Newell Reservoir Resort development. 8.2 Environmental Reserve Figure 8 shows the Plan area's Environmental Reserve lands. As previously described in this document, the environmental reserve lands consist of land within the EID 30+ metre shoreline setback and land within the 1:100 year floodplain. In this Plan, 19.4% of the total Plan area is Environmental Reserve land. Although the environmental reserve land is non-developable, it is open to the public and can be used by residents of the Lake Newell Reservoir Resort development as a natural walking path. The following policies regarding environmental reserve lands are aimed at achieving a high quality development: Policies: 1. Public access to lands immediately adjacent to the Lake Newell Reservoir shoreline will be maintained by providing public pathways to the shoreline. 2. Public shoreline areas and pedestrian access pathways will link public shoreline areas to the offshore development areas. 3. No development will be permitted on lands adjacent to the bed and on the shore of the inlet. 4. This Plan recognizes that the EID owns and controls the bed and shoreline of the r- Reservoir and that this ownership extends beyond the shore to include a 30+ metre buffer beyond the full water level of 767.8 metres above sea level (See Section 3.3.2). 24 h z ~ ~-' ~ °z a ~ J F-~ ° ' ~~ U O Q ~ a w y u W -- ~ H ~ ° ~ ~ w > $ ~ w W ~..~ d' ~ W F - w /-' p ~ ~ - z Z E~ W ~ ~ W so o ~ a i ~ ~ _ _ O 3 ~^ ~ ~~ J ~ ~ o c, ~ % .n d ~ ~. €a 9 ~ a ~ w w ~ ~ d - l o ~ ~ ^ ~ ~. a ~ < - s ~.s ~ ,~ ~ .~. ks G^ 'Gy]M O d Z o Z x Z ~„ ~ ~ ~Q ~,, ~- Lake Newell Reservoir Resort Area Structure Plan ~- 9.0 Transportation Figure 9 shows the proposed transportation network in the Plan area. An efficient transportation route is necessary for the management of local vehicular and pedestrian traffic. The road network will ensure the orderly and efficient movement of vehicles through the development. The Lake Newell Reservoir Resort development also contains green spaces and pathways that residents can use to walk around the development without having to walk along the road. 9.1 External Roads Twp. Road 182 is the main road that will provide access to the Plan area (See Figure 1). It runs east/west and forms the northern boundary of the subject lands. This two lane municipal road is double chip seal between its intersections with Highway 873 to the east and Lake Newell Resort Road to the west. Alternate access can be had south from the Town of Brooks via Young Road (Range Road 145) directly to the Lake Newell Reservoir Resort Area. Upgrades to Twp. Road 182, if necessary, will be negotiated with the County of Newell as part of the development agreement. The developer will make financial contributions towards the upgrading and maintenance of this road as deemed necessary, and to the satisfaction of Council. The specific details of these costs will be outlined in the development agreement. 9.2 Internal Roads Lake Newell Reservoir Resort Road is the main collector road that provides access to the development blocks on the west side of the Plan area. Lake Newell Reservoir Road is a paved 30 metre wide road with a ditch and swale for drainage. A similar collector road will be constructed on the east side of the Plan area as shown in Figure 9. All subdivision roads off the collector will be constructed to a chip seal standard, in accordance with County Standards and to the satisfaction of Council. Commercial uses are proposed at the intersection of Lake Newell Reservoir Resort Road and Twp. Road 182 and at the intersection of the proposed eastern collector and Twp. Road 182, as show in Figure 7. Measures will be taken to minimize congestion at these two intersections. Measures include offsetting the approaches to the commercial lots from the intersections and offsetting the commercial buildings from the roadways to provide for the efficient circulation of traffic through the commercial lots. In addition, ingress/egress to the commercial lots maybe limited to right in/right out turns. If deemed necessary by Council at the time of development right merge lanes maybe added. Costs for constructing the internal roadways for the proposed development shall be borne by the developer. Securities for the construction of roads will be addressed through a development agreement on a phase by phase basis (See Section 11.0 for securities details). Road improvements will occur concurrently with the construction of additional phases in order to increase cost effectiveness. 25 ~ a ~_~~ ~ J ~ $ ~ z 0 r : ~ Z c ~ :~; , ~, . y ~ O ~J-r ~ 3 = ^ L1 ~ V 2 ~~ ~ f 3 N ~ p "' o ~ z ~ F, ~~ F __: ~; G .3; .~ a i s Q ~ a ~ o ~ i ° ° o oC ~ d w ~ ~ W ~ _ ~, O ~ ,~ ~ N ... w a w m ~• zr C ~ O U ~ ~ ~ ~ G w ^ _ ~ _ ~ ~:.: l/~l ~ - ~. ~- _ -- I ' I i. i~ II I T1 fl'-~ _ - I~ - _ I /) iil a ~ ~ i_ _ _ ``. I I L~ ~ I ((~ °S ~ ~ - ~ ~ o I ~ ~~ ~w~ 0~8 ~ I ~?~ ~ _ ~ ~ w ~ ~ I _~ _ I ~ Y a ~ w ~ ~ ' W ~, I - - _ ~ Z w - - ' ~ - - ~ ) I jog LL ~ ~ ~ ~ I ~ ~ m _ j - _ ~ ~ - I ~ ~: iS~ m m ~ III ~~ ~ 3 I 3 ~ I K ~~/ --- Lake Newell Reservoir Resort Area Structure Plan ~- In general, based on TAC (Transportation Association of Canada) guidelines, a rural collector road with a 30 metre right-of--way has a capacity of 5,000 - 10,000 vehicle trips per day (vtpd}. Using figure of 10 vtpd generated per residence unit, at full-build out, the 700 units proposed in the Plan area and EID land would generate about 7,000 vtpd, which is within the capacity of the collector road. Policies: 1. All internal roadways will meet County of Newell road standards. 2. Costs of constructing the internal roadways for the proposed development will be borne by the developer. 3. Road improvements will occur concurrently with the construction of additional phases. 4. To minimize congestion at the intersections of the collectors and Twp. Road 182 approaches to commercial lots will be offset from the intersections and commercial buildings will be offset from the roads. 5. To minimize congestion at the intersections of the collectors and Twp. Road 182 ingress/egress maybe limited to right in/right out and right merge lanes maybe added if deemed necessary by Council at the time of development. 9.3 Parking ,.- Overflow parking capacity will be offered for existing residents in proposed R.V. storage. Future phases will contain wider roads and larger lots resulting in much more parking. Specifically, parking facilities will be constructed to a sufficient size on or near each commercial property to accommodate the users of those amenities. In addition, a parking and recreation vehicle storage facility will be built in Block 5 for area residents to use for a monthly fee. This R.V. storage site will displace the R.V's parked on the streets & yards of existing residents allowing more parking for vehicles. (See Figure 7). Most importantly, the new streets proposed in this ASP will allow for parking on both sides of the road as they will have a 15 metre wide paved surface. This is an improvement over the existing streets which have only a 6 metre wide surface. Policies: 1. Parking facilities will be constructed to a sufficient size on or near each commercial property to accommodate the users of those amenities. 2. A parking and recreational storage facility will be constructed in Block 5 for the use of area residents for a monthly fee. Fees will be collected by the developer of the R.V. site. 3. All new streets will be constructed with a minimum paved surface width of 15 metres. 4. Parking will be permitted on both sides of the new local roads. .- 26 Lake Newell Reservoir Resort Area Structure Plan ,~~' 9.4 Watercraft The following information are excerpts taken from the Woodbay study, which included an analysis and estimate of recreation boating capacity of the Lake Newell Reservoir. The instant boating capacity means the number of boats on the lake at any one time. 'The Woodbay report estimated the median instant boating capacity of Lake Newell Reservoir to be 284 fishing boats and 247 powerboats, and the maximum instant boating capacity to be 426 fishing boats and 329 powerboats. The total boating capacity of the Lake Newell Reservoir area (to account for boats beached on shore, in a marina, or otherwise not in use on the lake) was calculated by multiplying the instant boating capacity by three. This resulted in a median total boating capacity of 852 fishing boats and 741 powerboats, and a maximum total boating capacity of 1277 fishing boats and 987 powerboats. To protect water quality, bird nesting and breeding habitat, and the recreational enjoyment of other users, motorboat traffic should be regulated and restricted on Lake Newell Reservoir and in Greenwald Inlet. First, this Plan recommends that motorized boats be prohibited from the Greenwald Inlet water area north of the proposed future marina on the eastern side of the Plan area. 'This regulation will protect the sensitive bird-nesting habitat at the north end of Greenwald Inlet, protect areas for swimming, reduce erosion of the shoreline caused by wave action, and decrease noise pollution in the Lake Newell Reservoir Resort development. Additionally, there should be speed restrictions on motorboats around the two marina areas in Greenwald Inlet area until they are located a certain distance away from the shoreline into the lake proper. During low water periods, buoys and information will be needed to ensure safe boating conditions. The Resident's Association in conjunction with the EID and Alberta Environment could set up these regulations governing motorboat traffic in the Greenwald Inlet area. Second, this Plan recommends that motorboats be prohibited from the waters around Wildlife Protection and Enhancement areas in the south and east portions of the Lake Newell Reservoir, such as Pelican Island and the EID/Ducks Unlimited project on the east side of Kinbrook Island, where a number of important bird breeding and nesting grounds exist. Individual private boat launch and docking facilities will not be permitted in the Plan area. Two public docking areas are proposed in the Plan area -one on the west side of the inlet and one on the east side. 27 Lake Newell Reservoir Resort Area Structure Plan ,~. 10.0 Environmental Issues 10.1 Oil and Gas Wells and Pipelines The existence of numerous sour well sites and pipeline right-of--ways registered within the Plan area, as shown in Figure 5, constrain development through their setback requirements. The Alberta Energy and Utilities Board guidelines state that no residential development shall be permitted within 100 metres of an existing well site and within any of the pipeline right-of--ways. The proposed development has been designed to accommodate the existing well sites and pipeline right-of--ways. These policies will be followed in accordance with the AEUB guidelines with respect to these sites: 1. No development shall be permitted within the 100-metre setback of the existing gas well sites in the Lake Newell Reservoir Resort Plan area. 2. Development shall not be permitted on any of the pipeline right-of--ways within the Plan area. 10.2 Water Pollution and Shoreline Erosion Potential sources of water pollution include erosion, improper sewage disposal, litter, chemical ,.--. and pesticides run-off, and hydrocarbons. The proposed development will minimize erosion by preventing any development along the shoreline, regulating the storage, launching, and use of motorboats in Greenwald Inlet, following good construction practices, managing stormwater runoff, leaving the shoreline in its natural state, and planting cover vegetation to replace vegetation removed during construction. The proposed sewage disposal system will properly handle sewage disposal. This Plan discourages the frequent use of pesticides and other chemicals by any user in the Plan area and encourages the use of natural plants and materials for residential and commercial landscaping. 28 '~ i 0 o o r Z K ~ ~- - ~~~~ .. ~_ C C=7 m u. O ~ c ~ m ~ r~ v - ~ ~~ u, ~ Z y v ~ z v o c O G O ~, o ~~ ~~ ~ s c, A - ~ n '~ - A ~ ~, ~ ~, °' z ~ ~ - z ~, '^ r I ', ' I ~ ~ ~' ~ ~ - w ~; ~ ~ ~ ~ 0 ~ v, o O ~~ m 7 E ~ J ' ~ m _ ~ O r- ~o ~ ~ Z 7, ' o t a z ~ r z a ~~~~ ors i ~~~~ P W ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~~ I ~ ~ ~ ~~~ ~ 4 3 3 3 3 0~ I ~ a ~~~~ ~ T T T ~~ I t x w~ ~ pO w ~ m~ ' O C ~ S O r ~ ~ ~ ~ ZR 2 , ~ ~ ~~ J W ~ r T T T W GPI v ~ G M THE- ~~ i ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ I ~ L-~ ~ 00`8 ~s= ~ ~ ~ S~ y ~ o o ~$ ~ ~ z ~ ~ ~~ ~x z - ~ ~ ~ ~ 3 ~ Q ,. TTTT ~~ z 2 0 ~ O ~~ ZN~~ ~ ~~ W W ~ m ~t ~'~ .~ O -~ > ~w W OC W Q W ~ W ~~ Z W ~~ ~ ~ W ~a ~ ~ ~ d~ ~ Wz za 1 Ha ~ t w ~' Q I ~ a ~ ' zl o ~ ~~ ~ H ~ ~ O ~ J ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ O g --~~ ~ ~ a $ \ ~' E~ ~ ~ \ ~ a ~~ 1 Q w / ~ x~ w ~ o °~ ~ ~ ~ ~ a d ~ --. ---- ---I ! -i 0 O O $ o `^ o ti ~' x z ~ A ~ ' o o m B ~ ~, ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~. ('~ ~" S z o ~ ~ o 0 0 o m ~ ~~= Q ~ p O ~ dm ~ A n ~ z z z o 0 0 ~ ~ o n ~ °~ ~ ~ ~ 2 n ~ D N ~ N N ~ ~ ti D 'A ~ y f~~l f~ ~ S S ~ S ~-j L y _ p ~ A (7 D A <_ Y ~ A a . ~ S [+ 3s is ~ , ~ ] r7 ~~ D z i r N { Z ~ A r ~ a 6 i m _ _~ ~ .g ~ ~ ~..(~ ` I~~ _ n m _ _ o ~ ~~ ~ ~ g g e 'J ""~ ~ ~ I $ ~ \ ~ M~+ ~ I '~~ ~ ~ Z yy Ly 'n 3 ~ ~ , I ~ ~ ~ O ~ ~ ~~ 'n ~ o ~ T ~ r Lake Newell Reservoir Resort Area Structure Plan ~,.,, Policies: 1) The Lake Newell Utilities Corporation will provide potable water and water for irrigation. 2) Statutory rights to access groundwater will not be protected under the Area Structure Plan. Drilling of wells will not be permitted for individual residences in the subdivision. 3) A Restrictive Covenant will be registered on land titles to restrict drilling of wells on any of the lots. 4) All increased capacity required for new development will be designed to meet Alberta Environment requirements to the satisfaction of the County of Newell. 11.2 Wastewater Collection and Treatment Presently, a septic holding tank disposal system services the existing residential subdivisions in the area. The sewage generated by the proposed development contained in this Plan will initially be directed to this septic holding tank. From here, the sewage will be pumped out of the holding tank and into a pipeline, which will either go to the Town of Brook's sewage treatment system or to a sewage lagoon. The ASP development plan is not impacted whichever of these options of ultimate sewage treatment is selected, and can accommodate both options. The County will ultimately decide which of these options is selected to treat the sewage. ~... At the time of adoption, the County preferred the option of servicing the development by the Brooks sewage line extension. The ASP assumes that the tie-in with the Town of Brook's sewage system is the most likely scenario. But if the County ultimately does not approve that option, then a sewage lagoon will be constructed to service the proposed development. The sewage lagoon will be built in accordance with all Alberta Environment guidelines. The sewage line extension would be built in two stages. The first stage would include a sewage line extending from the Town of Brooks to the West Development. This line would service approximately 452 units (160 existing lots, 70 EID units, and 222 proposed units). The remaining units, above and beyond the 452 units serviced by the first line, will be serviced by a second sewage line as described below. The second stage of the sewage line extension would include a second parallel sewage line extending from the Town of Brooks to the proposed East Development. This line would service 248 units. It should be stressed that this second line will service the remaining units above and beyond the 452 units serviced by the first line. If the sewer line is to be constructed on the west side, the Alberta. and Federal Governments will contribute $600,000. The remainder of the costs will be borne by current residents (160 units), the proposed 70 units from EID land and 222 units encompassed in the west side of this plan (Blocks 2, 3, 5, 6, 8, and 9). Each Phase or block on the west side will be charged a per unit cost based on preliminary estimates of how many units will be built on each block. If there is a ~, transfer of units from one block to another, the cost will remain the same for that particular 30 Lake Newell Reservoir Resort Area Structure Plan ,- block. Therefore, there will be no alterations or re-evaluation of costs between blocks by the County. Costs will be done via an Improvement Tax that maybe paid out in full or be staggered over a ten-year period, plus interest. In the future, a sewer line on the east side maybe constructed but these costs will be borne on the units on the east side, when they are constructed. The commercial uses in this Plan include a lodge, a restaurant, a golf course, driving range and club house, a campground, docks and marina facilities, and a small number of additional commercial units. Each of these uses will include washroom facilities, which will be serviced by the sewage line. The following table presents estimated yearly amounts of sewage generated by each of the commercial uses in terms of residential equivalents: Table 3 -Commercial Sewage Volumes ~(it~lDOtC~~I U9C ~' S~:~lll~~~ ~f!V~~g~ ~iCH~~~ Vii' Marina, Lod e, and Restaurant (Block 6) 18 Commercial Site .W. corner of Block 10 1 Commercial Site (N.E. corner of Block 10) 1 Golf Clubhouse Block 10 33 Cam ound Block 10) 10 The above estimates for the sewage generated by the Marina, Lodge, and Restaurant, the two commercial sites, and the golf clubhouse are based on the residential equivalencies for a three bedroom as taken from Alberta. Environment's Standards and Guidelines for Municipal Waterworks, Wastewater and Storm Drainage Systems. The residential equivalency is 450 gallons per day. After each phase of development, the capacity of the sewage system will be assessed. Should it be determined that the sewage system does not have the capacity to service the subsequent phases, the total number of residential units proposed for in the subsequent phases as listed in Table 4 will be reduced. The reduction in the total number of units will be equivalent to what would be necessary to ensure that there is the sewage capacity for the subsequent phases. While the possibility of a sewage spill is very remote, a sewage spill could potentially contaminate the waters of the Lake Newell Reservoir. To avoid and if necessary contend with such a situation an Emergency Plan will be designed and implemented at the subdivision stage and revised on a phase per phase basis. The Emergency Plan will include steps, procedures, and required actions to be taken to prevent, contain, and clean up sewage spills. 31 Lake Newell Reservoir Resort Area Structure Plan 11.3 Stormwater Management On the west side of the Plan area, Swale ditches along the sides of the roads will be used to transport runoff into a stormwater containment pond located north of Block 1 (labelled Storm Pond in Figure 11). This pond will be designed to Alberta Environment standards. Natural runoff generated from the back of the units adjacent to the shoreline may flow through the 30+ metre Environmental Reserve buffer and into the Reservoir. The 30+ metre Environmental Reserve buffer will be kept in its natural state to enhance its ability to filter Stormwater runoff before it enters the Reservoir. On the east side of the Plan area, runoff will be directed into a series of dry ponds where it will settle and infiltrate into the groundwater table. The 30+ metre Environmental Reserve buffer will be kept in its natural state to enhance its ability to filter stormwater runoff before it enters the Reservoir. The proposed Stormwater management system is intended to contain runoff on site, allow for the infiltration of Stormwater into the groundwater table, and maintain the water quality of the Lake Newell Reservoir. Any developer who proposes subdivision within a block or phase of the Lake Newell Reservoir Resort Plan Area will be required to produce a Stormwater Management Plan that encompasses the west, north and/or east side of the Greenwald Inlet, as the case maybe. For instance, if the first subdivision application is for Block 2 on the west side, this would trigger the need for a ~.,, Stormwater Management Plan for the entire west side of the development. Similarly, if the first subdivision application on the east side is for Block 12, this would trigger a Stormwater Management Plan for the entire east side of the development. The requirement of the Stormwater Management Plan, in any case, will be a condition of subdivision approval as required by the County of Newell and will be referred to Alberta Environment and the EID for approval. The Stormwater Management Plan will address the volume of runoff entering the reservoir and propose options that limit this volume, with the view of minimizing contamination of the Lake Newell Reservoir. Policies: 1) Runoff should be allowed to naturally percolate into the groundwater table by directing it to dry ponds and a stormwater containment pond in the Plan area. 2) Runoff on the rear of lots adjacent to the shoreline maybe allowed to naturally drain through the 30+ metre Environmental Reserve buffer and into the Reservoir. 3) The 30+ metre Environmental Reserve buffer will be left in its natural state. 4) Any releases of runoff from the stormwater containment pond into the Reservoir will be atpre-development flow-rates. 5) The Stormwater containment pond must be designed to Alberta. Environment standards. 32 Lake Newell Reservoir Resort Area Structure Plan ,_,. 11.4 Electrical Services Utilicorp provides lines and transformers that are located throughout the subdivision. These distribution transformers were installed in 1994. Utilicorp has confirmed that they have electrical capacity to service the proposed 630-unit Lake Newell Reservoir Resort development (see letter from Utilicorp in Appendix D). 11.5 Natural Gas Dinosaur Gas Co-op provides natural gas service from a pipeline running parallel to the main collector road. Expansion capacity exists to service the proposed development. 11.6 Telephone and Cable Telus will provide telephone services to the Plan area. Presently, there are no cable services available to the Plan area, as the Lake Newell Reservoir area is out of the range of Monarch Cable, the cable supplier to the Town of Brooks. Nevertheless, cable service maybe available at a later date depending on the development's population absorption rates. 33 Lake Newell Reservoir Resort Area Structure Plan ~- 12.0 Community Services 12.1 Police Service Police service to the Plan area will be provided by RCMP detachments located in the Town of Brooks. 12.2 Fire Protection In the interim, fire protection will be provided to the Plan area by the County of Newell via the Division 5 & 10 Rural Fire Department. As the further phases are completed, a point maybe reached where the fire service provided by the Division 5 & 10 Rural Fire Department will be considered to be insufficient and the Plan area will require its own fire service and fire hall. The time at which it would be necessary to organise a fire service and construct a fire hall for the Plan area will be determined between the County of Newell and the Resident's Association. 12.3 Emergency Medical Services Ambulance and hospital services located in the Town of Brooks will provide emergency medical services to the Plan area. 12.4 Solid Waste Services Presently, residents in the White Pelican View and Blue Heron Subdivisions (Blocks 1 & 4) transfer their garbage from their homes to a 40 cubic yard Compacting Container located at a Utility site in the Plan area. There are currently no individual garbage pick-up services in the Plan area. The Lake Newell Condominium Association hires a private contractor to pick the compacting container up, transfer the container to the Newell Regional Landfill, dump the garbage, and return the container to the Utility site. There is no separate tipping fee for the landfill, but each resident pays a per unit fee to the Condominium Association that covers the cost of the private contractor. Solid waste disposal in the Plan area will be handled by a system similar to the existing one outlined above. Individual unit owners will transfer their garbage to a common Garbage Compacting Container in the Plan area, where a private contractor will transport the Container to the Newell Regional Landfill, unload it, and return it. Each resident or commercial operator in the Plan area will pay a fee to the proposed Resident's Association for the costs of the private contractor. The Resident's Association will also be responsible for the cleanup of debris and garbage in the environmental reserve areas including the 30+ setback required by the EID according to the approval and agreement of the EID. There are currently no recycling services in the Plan area. The closest recycling bins are located in the Town of Brooks. 'This Plan recommends that the proposed Resident's Association examine the feasibility of recycling in the Plan area as the development proceeds. 34 Lake Newell Reservoir Resort Area Structure Plan ~,,, The Newell Regional Landfill is located along Highway 36, about three to five kilometres north of the intersection of Highway 1 and Highway 36. With capacity to serve a population of 25,000 for 30-40 years, the Newell Regional Landfill has sufficient capacity to serve the proposed Lake Newell Reservoir Resort development. .-- ,~- 35 Lake Newell Reservoir Resort Area Structure Plan r-. 13.0 Development Sequence Development will begin in areas closest to existing development and major services. The existing underground water and sanitary trunks running north/south through the southwest portion of the Plan area already meet the needs of the existing Blue Heron Bay and White Pelican View subdivisions. The most logical extension of these utilities would be first north around the west side of Greenwald Inlet, then east around the north end of the Inlet, and then south around the east side of the Inlet. The Phasing Plan follows the direction of the logical extension of these utilities. 13.1 Phasing Plan The proposed development will be completed in five phases, shown in Figure 12. Phase 1 is the largest of the phases with approximately 208 residential units and consists of Blocks 2, 3, 5, 6, & 8. Specifically, this phase includes the development of Block 3 as amulti-residential site, three single-detached housing residential blocks (Blocks 2, 5 & 8), and the Marina and Lodge facilities (Block 6). Concurrent with Phase 1, the developer or a private operator will upgrade and/or expand the existing public docking/boat launch facility on the west side of the Inlet. The developer will also construct any mooring buoys and floating platforms, temporary structures, shoreline protective structures, and other developments or uses on the lakebed, west shoreline, or within the shoreline area. Any permanent modification within the shoreline area or lakebed will require authorization from EID, Alberta. Environment, and any other relevant governmental ,-- departments. Phase 2 (Block 9) will have the construction of approximately 40 units in the single-detached housing residential block in the NE'/4 Section 12-18-15-W4. Phase 3 (Blocks 10 & 11) covering the north and northeast portions of the Plan area, consists of the golf course, the campground, the local commercial sites, two small multi-residential sites, and asingle-detached housing residential block. Phase 3 will have approximately 47 residential units. The construction of the east collector road will begin during Phase 3. Phase 4 (Block 12} contains approximately 60 single-detached housing units along the east side of the Plan area. The construction of the east collector road will be finished during this phase. Concurrent with Phase 4, the developer or a private party will construct a new public docking/boat launch facility on the east side of the Inlet. The developer will also construct any necessary mooring buoys and floating platforms, temporary structures, shoreline protective structures, and other developments or uses on the lakebed, east shoreline, or within the shoreline area. Phase 5 (Block 13), located in the southeast portion of the Plan area, consists of the development of approximately 70 single-detached housing units and a recreationaUpark area. This Plan allows for the transfer of residential units from one block to another at the subdivision ~... stage. Thus, the total number of residential units assigned to Blocks 1 to 12 (as depicted in Table 5 and shown in Figure 13) is an estimate and may change at the time of subdivision. The number 36 W Z z r O ~' ~ '~ a ~--~ ^~ Z °' m ~ ~ ~ z Qo z ~ H ~ ~ ~s N ~ ~ a ~_ ~~w ~o _- ~ o 0 c ~ ~~~ o~ ~ v ~ n aa~~. ,~ s ~a~ Z ~ ~_ a ~, o y •~ > Y h F w w w~ N ~ LL o a ` a a a x - o _ m a ~ w _ w - a ~~f: a~, . 3 3 N fi ~ .t =a J m W o o .,, z r:; __ o~~~~ 0 ~, ~; ~,, ~~ ~~ ~~ ~~, ~~ -~ ~~ ~ y W Y V 0 [I.a m O 7 M ~ i a .G ~ d 3 ~ v_ d m m sa ~ ~%i Z y~~ ^J ~ Q JS JS g 2 z z rt. ~ `y' F m ~ ~ v _ yg O ~G L..' ~ W a ~ g ~ < a 5 a 0 o 3 F V Z '_ J ~ m 5 ~ J J J J J J J b Q J 0 ~ ~ ~ ~ - $ K ~_~M<~mm~~~~~ o ~ Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y U YU Y Y ~ J ~ m m m 0 O m 0 Om 0 0 0 m O a o J N ~ o m z ~ m m J m J m m i~l n I M ~ .--i 1, U - x O -_ - O - U .a ~ p ~_i~ cn ~ ~ - ,~ ~ CA .~ ~ r CQ ~- m = ---- ! - - - - -- i ~° ~ t - -- _~~ ~i ~ ~~ ~~ , e ~~ °~+ 1~~~ ~ J ~~ ~ j ~ ~ `~ ~ -~~. l y ~ ~ ~~- ~~ ~ I ~ f ~ a ~'1 .. -~l~ /~ 00 F° ~ - U o -_ U _ U \ I~ C v I _ d J ~ L ~ N ~o a ___ .-.~' ~\ ~_r /~{I I~ ._.~. =~ ,_~ Ir_J / I ,; ~~~ ~' _`_-._J N _%~~ U - `i a d ~' a ~ ` ~-' ' ~_ Mm yyy x U `'~ ~~ O ~ o ~ _~_~~ ,~~~ ,~ F ~ Y ~~ U ol ~~~-'~~ I~ Y_ I 0 y~ A y I a ~~~- . ~$~n ~ a % ~. f& r g ~ o w ~~ d ..: > f r~ m o Z !~ 3 v Z ~: ~ i ~ x, O w Y Q ~ W w w z ~ ~x U 0 Ma W d- W IS u l ~W~r~ (~('~// it ~ ~ ~ , ;,_~._.> Lake Newell Reservoir Resort Area Structure Plan of units assigned to each block in Table 5 can only be increased by a maximum of 20%. It should be emphasised that the total number of units in the Plan area will not exceed 630. Table 4 below illustrates the development of Phases 1-5, the remaining portions of the Plan area, and the future EID land. Subdivision will be required in all 5 phases. Table 4 -Phasing Plan l T MR Land Use e of Ph Legal Description Blocks Area Types of Development ota as Development (acres) No. area Change Units (acres) Re uired 1 Ptn. N.W. 6-1K-14-4, ?, 3, 5, 76.3 Single-family dwellings, 208 10.7 Yes Ptn. N.E. 1-18-15-4, 6, & 8 Multi-family dwellings, Ptn. S.E. 1-18-15-4, Lodge and Restaurant, Ptn. S.W. 7-18-14-4, Marina 7-18-14-4 W Ptn N . . 9 1 Ye 2 Ptn. NE 12-18-15-4 9 13.3 Single-family dwellings 40 . s & Ptn. N W 7-18-14-4 17 0 Y 3 Ptn. NE 12-18-15-4 10 & 11 121.7 Golf course and driving 92 . es & range, Golf Club House, Ptn. N W 7-18-14-4 Commercial sites, Campground, Multi- family dwellings, and Single-family dwellings 4 Pm. N.W. 7-18-14-4, 12 58.2 Single-family dwellings, 60 8.2 Yes Ptn. S. W. 7-18-14-4, and Dock/marina Ptn. N.W. 6-18-14-4, & Pm. N.E. 6-18-14-4 5 Ptn. N.W. 6-18-14-4, 13 122.2 Single-family 70 18.4 Yes Ptn. N.E. 6-18-14-4, Dwellings, Park and Ptn. S.E. 6-18-14-4, & Recreational facilities Pm S.W. 6-18-14-4 Total for 5 - 391.7 - 470 56.2 - Phases Existing Lots Ptn. N.W. 6-18-14-4, 1 & 4 32.1 Single-family detached 160 8.0 No area Ptn. N.E. 1-18-15-4, & housing Pm. S.E. 1-18-15-4 Existing West Road Plan 3280 B.M. 24.2 Existing Lake Newell N/A N/A No Road Resort Road (west) Total ER area Plan 9311658 107.7 No develo ment N/A N/A N/A Total for - 555.7 - 630 64.2 - Plan Area EID 70 units Ptn. NE 1-18-15-4 105.6 Unknown 70 Unkn Unkn land Total Plan - 661.3 - 700 Unkn - Area & ~ EID land 37 uo~ ~~~~. ~ I J Lake Newell Reservoir Resort Area Structure Plan Each development phase is divided into blocks as shown in Figure 13 and as illustrated below in Table 5. Table S -Block Plan Block Legal Description Area Types of Development Total No. Land Use (acres) Residential Change Units Re uired l Ptn. N.W. 6-18-14-4 11.4 Existing Single-family 80 No dwellings 2 Ptn. N.W. 6-18-14-4 15.2 Single-family dwellings 50 Yes Ptn. N.E. 1-18-15-4 3 Ptn. N.E. 1-18-IS-4 5.6 Multi-famil dwellin s 50 Yes 4 Ptn. N.E. 1-18-15-4 20.7 Existing Single-family 80 No & dwellings Ptn. S.E. 1-18-15-4 5 Ptn. N.E. 1-18-15-4 15.3 Parking facilities and 20 Yes Single-famil dwellin s 6 Ptn. N.E. 1-18-15-4 9.8 Lodge and restaurant, 18* & and Marina Ptn. S.E. 1-18-15-4 8 Ptn. S.W. 7-18-14-4 30.5 Single-family dwellings 70 Yes Ptn N.W. 7-18-14-4 9 Ptn. N.E. 12-18-15-4 13.3 Single-family dwellings 40 Yes Ptn N.W. 7-18-14-4 10 Pm. N.E. 12-18-15-4 70.7 Golf course and driving 52** No & range, Golf Club Ptn. N.W. 7-18-14-4 House, Commercial sites, Campground, and Multi-family dwellings. 11 Ptn. N.W. 7-18-14-4 51.0 Single-family dwellings 40 Yes and Multi-family dwellings 12 Ptn. N.W. 7-18-14-4, 58.2 Single-family dwellings 60 Yes Ptn. S.W. 7-18-14-4, and Dock/marina Ptn. N.W. 6- 18-14-4, & Ptn. N.E. 6-18-14-4 13 Ptn. N.W. 6-18-14-4, 122.2 Single-family 70 Yes Ptn. N.E. 6-18-14-4, & dwellings, park and Ptn. S.E. 6-18-14-4 recreational facilities TOTAL _ 423.9 - 630 - Notes: * 18 Residential Unit Equivalencies are allocated for the Marina, Lodge, and Restaurant (See Table 3). ** 45 Residential Unit Equivalencies are allocated for the Golf Club House, Commercial Sites, and Campground (See Table 3}. 38 Lake Newell Reservoir Resort Area Structure Plan .-- Appendix A: Confirmation of electrical capacity letter from Utilicorp Networks Canada Ltd. Wednesday 18 of Feb 2003 Aquila Networks Can.->2300335 Page 2 of 2 r~•••:: • i= .~ Customer IMeracti Services 700, 801 lave S.W. Calgary, Alta T2P 3P7 Date: 03/02/19 To: Alan Drolet Phone: 403-230-5522 Company: Flaming Protocol Fax: 403-230-0335 from : GORO HOFER Ph: (403) 514-4170 CustomerlnteractionServices Fax: (403) 514-5170 gord.hofer@aquila.com Number of Pages including This Cover Sheel: 1 If you do not receive o11 page:, please call GORD HOfER at (403) 514-4170 RE: Proposed 630 Lot Development For Lake Newell Resort Ref# 2037750 For you information. Aquila currently has the capacity for this proposed development. Please give me a call if you have any questions Gord Hofer Aquila Networks Canada Ltd. ~-- Lake Newell Reservoir Resort Area Structure Plan ~-- Appendix B: Historical Resources Impact Assessment letter from Alberta Community Development Cultural Facilities and Historical Resources Division /.Oh~erpa ~._ ,.-, COMMUNRY DEVELOPMENT Guttural Fadlities and Historical Resouross Division Office of the Assistant Deputy Mintstar December 3, 2002 Mr. Matt Rockley Planning Protocol Inc. 3916 -1~` Street NE Calgary, Alberta TZE 3E3 Dear Mr. Rockley: Old St Stephen's Colleen tf820 -112 Street Edmonton, Alberta Canada T6G 2P8 .1 Telephone 7110/431-2300 Fax 7ttOV427-ti598 Our File(s): 4835-02-07i, 2002-241 SUBJECT: LAKE NEWELL RESORT . ALL SEC 6 & W ~i 7-18-14-W4M, ALL SEC 1 & NE 12-18-15 W4M 'HISTORICAL RESOURCES IlvlPACT ASSESSMENT II~TAT. RR ' RT, PERMIT 7M? 741 , d Staff of the Heritage Resource Management Branch have recently reviewed a copy of the Final ~^ Report submitted by your archaeological consultant, Eugene Gryba, in which he presents the results of the Historical Resources Impact Assessment that he conducted on the captioned project. HISTORICAL RESOURCES IlVIPACT ASSESSMENT (PERMIT 2002-241) Terms of Reference Under Mitigative Research Permit 2002-241, Eugene Gryba conducted an Historical Resources Impact Assessment on an extension to a previously proposed subdivision that was investigated under Permits 93-026 and 93-084 and completed the required mitigation of 2 sites discovered under those earlier permits. Foot traverses and 25 shovel tests were used to assess the extension area and the sites were mitigated by shovel and screen. Results Two new historical resource sites (EcOx-18, EdOx-28) were recorded during the course of this assessment and outstanding mitigation requirements were completed for sites EdOx-13 and EdOx-16 as follows: 1. EcOx=18: The site consists of a surface scatter (3 debitage, 1 split cobble) found in a blowout. Ten shovel tests in the site area were negative. Based on these results staff of the Heritage !"' Resource Management Branch have recommended that additional studies are not necessary at this site. I agree with this recommendation. ...cont. Q Printed on recycled paper :._ Mr. Matt Rockley December 3, 2002 Page 2 2. EdOx-28: The site consists of a surface scatter (2 debitage). Four shovel tests in the site area were negative. Based on these results staff of the Heritage Resource Management Branch have recommended that additional studies are not necessary at this site. I agree with this recommendation. 3. EdOx-13: The site was previously recorded and had outstanding mitigation requirements. The site consists of 3 tipi rings, two of the rings being poorly defined. The site and the rings were mapped and 1 x 2 metre unit was excavated in each ring. The excavation results were sparse (7 debitage in total). Based on these results staff of the Heritage Resource Management Branch have recommended that-addit~onal studies are not necessary at this site. I agree with this recommendation. 4. EdOx-16: The site was previously recorded and had outstanding mitigation requirements. The sits consists of a single stone cairn. The cairn feature was mapped both before and during excavation. A total of 4 square metres of excavation centered on the cairn produced a total of 17 lithics and 13 bone fragments. Based on these results staff of the Heritage Resource Management Branch have recommended that additional studies arg:.not necessary at this site. I agree with this recommendation. HISTORICALRESOURCESACT CLEARANCE Alberta Community Development's requirements with regard to archaeological sites EcOx-18, EdOx-28, EdOx-13 and EdOx-16 have been satisfactorily addressed through the archaeological studies that have been completed by Eugene Gryba. From an historical resources perspective development may proceed on this project. Should you require additional information or have any questions regarding our Department's review of this project, please contact Ram Newton of the NPritavP RPC~nrrP A~anaaPmPnt Rra~nc;h (7Rn-4~1_ ~~n~ (`nltnral~RarilitiPC anri Aictnri~al RPCnim Pc ni~hSinn, Alh~rra ~'`nmmnnity T~PVP1nnmPnt, RR?.n 11 ~ ctrs...t, F.timnntnn,~~g, TfiCT APR, nr Raz 7Rn-4?7 ____~_ On behalf of Alberta Community Development, I would like to thank you for your co-operation in our endeavour to conserve Alberta's past. Sincerely, Mark Rasmussen 1 Assistant Deputy Minister Cultural Facilities and Historical Resources Division cc: Eugene Gryba, Calgary Lake Newell Reservoir Resort Area Structure Plan Appendix C: EID letter vr. a~• vV VV.V. yi 7YY JVL VLVY G1L DAVI/AJ ~ cut .. $~ Br•01rs, Acerb Caaeda'17R i1R ~~ t~I s~t~N ~= pastern Irrigation nfstrfict ~,,;~~~ February 10, 2003 Planning )Protocol Inc. By Mail and Fear (1-40.3-?3M133S~ 3915 - lst Street N.E. Calgary, Alberta T2E 3E3 Attention: Alma IOrolet Dear Sirs: ItE: !rake NcweQ Kesort Arta Stnrctnre Plan We are writing in response to the questions raised in your Inner of Febnrary 3, 2003 as follows: Y. Water QaaGty for Swianming, Fishing and Other Water Activities No comment. 2. water)(,cvtl Piactaatinas bake Newell is an operating resexvoix for the Eastern Irrigation District aril is subjoct to fluctuations. The lalx !curl can drop as much as 3.0 metres from the full supply revel '~ (FSI;) of 777 md~s above sea level. During normal years it wouldn't fluctuate that much. While this may increase the amount of beach in shoreline areas ii would reduce the boating arr~a un the lake and create shallow water hazards. Your 1999 draft Greenwald Inlet fast An-a Siruchtre Plan Suction 2.5 (1) included an important eomuount in regard to water Icvcl fluctuation in the lake as follows: "Lake Newell Reservoir water keel will vary caused by unrredictable water supply and demand IIuc:tuutiuns. In consideration of this and to guarantee public access to the Gx+eenwald Inlet shoreline, a minimum setback buffer strip of 100 feet (30 metres) from the Laiae Newell 1~-vair full supply level {F.S.L.) should be required as a buffer." In 1993 a "Plan Showing Survey of ltcscrvoir Right~f--Way" was registered as Plan Nu. 9311 b58. This plan formally set out the boundaries ofG~rocnwald lnlct and an a portion of the north end of the lake, including fiat 100 foot buffer area. Wa view the lake Icvel fluctuations and the buffer zone as important eler~nents in planning for development on the lake. 3. Reaideatial Unit Capacities No comment. 4(a). Boat Capacity No comment. RfIJl ~_ t~ r vr.av ..v vv. v~ ya ~vv avr vrvv uau unvvaw ` ~a~e ri tnc. p~~z Febmary 10, 2003 ,~` 4(b~ Boat Restricted Areas The Wood Bay report on page 36-37 indicates that shallow areas in the lake would reduce the use of fvccd-keel boats. In addition, there is rcfcxcacc to "a I ZOm. reserve in front of existing and proposed public beaches, marinas, Lakeshore residential dcveloptocnts and public boat launch sites; and an unspocified reserve for shallow, weedy areas, special wildlife cottservatioa a~as, etc. extending beyond the fOm reserves, On page 28, the report refers to Wildlife Protection and Enhancement Areas as being particularly Pelican Island (idcatiSed on Drawing 3 - p.26), other islands and the BID/DU pmjoet on the cast silo of K3nbrook Island. Wt ttndcrstand that the n~tticted areas would apply to powerboats and not canoes. We think that these comments on reserves and non-power areas would still be applicable today. You have also asked whether the reservoir would ever dry up anough during certain times of the year and limit its recreational capacity to such an extaat as to prevent boating. It is possible and occurred as recently as Summer 2001 when drought conditions and demand for water dropped the lake Tavel by S ft. and left short areas substantially rocaded, pII that occasion the marina area was left half dry with the rest in very shallow water while other shallow areas in the lake tncedc~ as much as 300 feet. The Greenwald In1ct channel was also aft'eeted, particularly ai the north end. By the end of 200 iho reservoir was again up to its aormal pre-winter Ievel. d(c). Can boats dock anywhere or does EID prefer apecffiic areas ~-- Quotation from the 1999 draft Gr~eeuwald Tnlet East Area Structure Plan Section 2.5 (4) follows: "Individual private boat launches will not be allowed. The development ~of community, institutional or public boat launch facilities and publia r+ecreatian facilities will be pcrrnittcd whar+e, in the opinion ofthc EID, i't is prudcm: ' EID still favw,rs this approach. 5. Commrnts in Support of Proposed Development No comment. if you have any fiuther questions or require any clarification, please contact the writar at (403) 362-1400. Sincerely, Eastern Irrigation nistrict Edward Hildebrand Resource Planning and Developme~at 9tJVV~ c.c. Earl Wilson, Elp Lake Newell Reservoir Resort Area Structure Plan ~- Appendix D: Lake Newell Utilities Corporation Letter on Water Capacity .- Og/Y6/OS 11:42 $`1 403 X62 6206 EID BROOKS ~--- ~ 001/001 P.0. Bsg 6 550 Industmi Road B~~s AlbEtta Ltinsda T1R1132 P6onG (~03j 362-I~~O Fax: (403) 967x6206 Email: dd~ddaetor0 March 26, 2003 By Fiz 1-403~?.30-5924 Mr. Rod Potrie lPlapnung Protocol Inc. 3916 -1" Street N.E. Calgary, Alberta 7.'ZS 3E3 llear Mr. Potric, JtE: Like Newell Resort Area Structuiee lean Status of Labe Newell. IItt7ity Inc. Or- Jaiuiaty 28, 2003 we received your letter' requesting a coneot fmrn Lake Newell Utility Ync, to provide treated water to the developments proposed tinder the Lake Newell Resort Area 5tructtrre Plan. Shortly a$er receipt of the letter, BJU amore a letter to t1>e County proposing that Lake Newell Utility Jac. be trar~fcrred to the Couuoty. Since we did not reoeave a reply to our ~-- earbier letter, we have today written a Ietter to Mr Allan Martens of the Caunty of Newell, to detex~oo~ne if the proposal to - the trtr'lity ownership has been considered by the County Cotmcil or when it may be considered. As you maybe awarie, EID ac~uinod the trtility to mtsvn that tbae would be continuity of service ira the short term but with a view that the facn'lity would evenhiaIIy be tramsfarod either to a Lake Newell Resort hamlet or to the County of Newell No. 4. Since hamlet status does not seem to be possible in the near future, the BID Board believes that it is now appmpriate to t~ransfar the utility to the Courriy. If the Councal accepts the transf~et proposal made by EIU, h would then allow the - County to have control over future water commitments such as those requested in your letter. Sincerely, F.asteria Irrigation nisbrict I3d Hildebrand . Resource Planriuig and Development c.c. Sari Wilson, EID Jeer Shergill, Westbridge Land Developments lire. (By Fax 1-403-210-2226) .- Eastern Irrigation District Lake Newell Reservoir Resort Area Structure Plan Appendix E: Road Cross-Sections ~- e _ O ~ ~ ~~ f~ ~~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ E p ~~ Y a ~n ~ ~ ~ ~ ~-- H T~ V TW T TI TT T ~~ FT-ill V a U a ~1 ~~ J U i- ~ 0 ~s z ~ ~, 3 v ~ ~ ~a ~ E~ ~ 3 J i K ~ $~ ~ s ~ ~ Q W J W °- c o AatllINHS ~ ~" ~ N ~ a3ivn o ,~ u'i O H ~~ r 1 3 ~` ~.J ~ J J~ _ __~ ~ ~ U ~ ~ ~~ I z ~ ~ ,~~~ ~ ~ ~ o ~ ~~. 7~ J 't~v nH d.. W ~ Z ~ ~ aq N ~y v 0 s s-* _~ 3 ~~ E ~~ ~p ~ ~ Y e ~ ~~ ^ ~ ~ a H r~ V rW r T! rT r 0 nH ~^ f'1 HI i1 ~~ J U P~~ i-- ~ ~ _ ~ nt ~~ ~~ ~ ~ ~ ~ { Y~ ~ < S ~ `y~ O Q b ~ F ~~ W {{^,~ uO \TTT~`l V TW T TI TT T V U ~-, a /~/^,\ V S E--~ ~/ J U 9